advertisement
Home » News » Aligned Goals Increase Desire to Copy Others

Aligned Goals Increase Desire to Copy Others

Intentionally or not, people often copy the actions of others. New research suggests that people only feel the urge to mimic each other when they have the same goal.

The study, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds it is common for individuals to pick up on each other’s movements.

“This is the notion that when you’re having a conversation with somebody and you don’t care where your hands are, and the other person scratches their head, you scratch your head,” says co-author Sasha Ondobaka, a doctoral student at Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands.

This kind of mimicry is well-established, but Ondobaka and his colleagues suspected that what people mimic depends on their goals.

“If you and I both want to drink coffee, it would be good for me to synchronize my movement with yours,” Ondobaka said. “But if you’re going for a walk and I need coffee, it wouldn’t make sense to be coupled on this movement level.”

In the study, researchers designed an experiment to see whether having the same or different goals influenced the copying of behavior.

Each participant sat across from an experimenter. They played a sort of card game on a touch screen embedded in the table between. First, two cards appeared in front of the experimenter, who chose either the higher or the lower card.

Then two cards appeared in front of the participant. This happened 16 times in a row. For some 16-game series, the participant was told to do the same as the experimenter—to choose the higher (or lower) card.

For others, they were told to do the opposite. Participants were told to move as quickly and as accurately as possible.

When the participant was supposed to make the same choice as the experimenter, they moved faster when they were also reaching in the same direction as the experimenter.

But when they were told to do the opposite of the experimenter—when they had different goals—they didn’t go any faster when making the same movement as the other person.

This means having different goals got in the way of the urge to mimic, Ondobaka says.

Investigators believe this shows that people only copy each other’s movements when they’re trying to accomplish the same thing. The rest of the time, actions are more related to your internal goals.

“We’re not walking around like chameleons copying everything,” Ondobaka says. If you’re on a busy street with dozens of people in view, you’re not copying everything everybody does—just the ones that have the same goal as you. “If a colleague or a friend is going with you, you will cross the street together.”

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Aligned Goals Increase Desire to Copy Others

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Aligned Goals Increase Desire to Copy Others. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/01/12/aligned-goals-increase-desire-to-copy-others/33591.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.