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Stop-Smoking Drug Chantix Increases Cardiovascular Risk

Smoking Cessation Drug Chantix Increases Cardiovascular RiskResearchers have urged the Food and Drug Administration to take varenicline (brand name Chantix), a popular smoking cessation drug, off the market after linking it to a striking increase of serious cardiovascular problems.

Investigators from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the University of East Anglia determined that the use of varenicline is associated with a 72 percent increased risk of hospitalization due to a serious adverse cardiovascular (CV) event, such as heart attack or arrhythmia.

Prior research has determined Chantix is associated with risks of depression, agitation and suicidal thoughts.

The study appears the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

“We have known for many years that Chantix is one of the most harmful prescription drugs on the U.S. market, based on the number of serious adverse effects reported to the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration),” said Curt D. Furberg, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest Baptist, lead investigator on the study, and a nationally recognized leader in drug safety research.

“It causes loss of consciousness, visual disturbances, suicides, violence, depression and worsening of diabetes. To this list we now can add serious cardiovascular events.”

Heart disease is a common cause of serious illness and death in smokers and is often a reason for people to stop smoking. Varenicline is one of the most commonly used drugs to help people quit smoking worldwide. When varenicline was launched in 2006, the FDA safety reviewers reported that existing data indicated it could raise the risk of adverse cardiac events.

The FDA recently updated the label for Chantix based on a small increased risk of cardiovascular events among smokers with heart disease.

The team of researchers sought to investigate the serious cardiac effects of varenicline in tobacco users (smokers or smokeless tobacco users) compared with placebo in clinical trials.

They looked at 14 double-blind, randomized, controlled trials that included more than 8,200 patients (4,908 people on varenicline and 3,308 taking placebos). All trials, except one, excluded people with a history of heart disease, and none of the studies followed participants for longer than one year.

In the study, 52 of 4,908 (1.06 percent) participants taking varenicline had adverse events compared with 27 of 3,308 (0.82 percent) participants on placebo, while the number of people who died in each group was the same (seven). The majority of study participants were men and averaged less than 45 years of age.

“Among tobacco users varenicline use was associated with a significantly increased risk of serious adverse cardiovascular events greater than 72 percent,” the researchers wrote. “These increased risks of adverse cardiovascular events are seen in smokers with or without heart disease.”

The researchers noted additional risks of using the drug, found in previous studies, that led to an existing box warning from the FDA – risks of depression, agitation and suicidal thoughts.

“People should be concerned,” said Sonal Singh, M.D., M.P.H., lead author on the study from Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. “They don’t need Chantix to quit, and this is another reason to consider avoiding Chantix altogether.”

In the paper, the researchers wrote that “clinicians should carefully balance the risk of serious cardiovascular events and other serious neuropsychiatric adverse events associated with varenicline against their known benefits on smoking cessation.”

“The sum of all serious adverse effects of Chantix clearly outweigh the most positive effect of the drug in my view,” Furberg said. “The time has come for the FDA to withdraw the drug from the market.”

Source: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Stop-Smoking Drug Chantix Increases Cardiovascular Risk

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Stop-Smoking Drug Chantix Increases Cardiovascular Risk. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/07/05/stop-smoking-drug-chantix-increases-cardiovascular-risk/27460.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.