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TV Shows Can Model Sexual Health Dialogue

TV Shows Can Model Sexual Health DialogueMaybe watching the boob tube isn’t so bad after all. Researchers have discovered viewing television conversations about sensitive sexual topics helps people talk about comparable topics with friends, partners and doctors.

Investigators discovered college students were more than twice as likely to talk about sexual health issues with their partners after watching a “Sex and the City” episode featuring the characters Samantha and Miranda having similar conversations.

Study participants were shown one of three versions of the TV episode, all of which were edited for purposes of the study. In one version, Samantha and Miranda have discussions with friends, doctors and sexual partners related to the sexually transmitted diseases chlamydia and HIV.

Other participants saw a version of the same episode that included content about HIV and chlamydia, but did not include any scenes in which the characters extensively discussed their thoughts about the diseases with others. A third group of participants saw a completely different episode of “Sex and the City” with no relation to sexual diseases.

“One of the powerful things about entertainment programming is that it can get people talking about important issues that they might not otherwise talk about,” said Emily Moyer-Gusé, Ph.D., lead author of the study.

However, the entertainment vehicle must be specific and overt. That is, the TV show can’t just raise the topic of sexual health — the characters in the TV show have to be shown having frank discussions with their friends, partners and doctors.

“Viewers will model their behavior after the TV characters, and have these conversations in their own lives,” she said.

The study, which included 243 college students with a mean age of 20, appears in the June 2011 issue of the Journal of Communication.

Immediately after viewing the program, participants completed a questionnaire assessing their reaction to the program, and a range of other questions about their identification with the characters and their thoughts and plans concerning talking about sexually transmitted diseases.

Two weeks later, all participants completed an online questionnaire concerning whether they had talked to others about sexual health issues. The results suggested that many people may be more likely to discuss sexual health issues with others when they see favorite characters on TV do the same, Moyer-Gusé said.

Almost half (46 percent) of the participants who saw the “Sex and the City” characters discuss sexual health issues ended up talking to their romantic partner about the subject in the following two weeks.

In contrast, only 21 percent who saw the similar episode about sexual health issues, but with no character discussions, ended up talking about the issues with their romantic partner. (About 15 percent of those who watched the unrelated episode had such discussions with their partner.)

“That’s a pretty substantial behavioral effect after watching just one episode of a TV show,” Moyer-Gusé said.

“When participants saw the characters demonstrate the confidence and ability to successfully navigate these tricky conversations, it gave them a social script to follow in their own lives. They felt they had the ability to bring up these difficult issues.”

Researchers believe the change in behavior was dependent upon the viewers becoming attached to the “Sex and the City” characters, that is, the viewers had to identify with the “Sex and the City” characters in order for the episode to affect their behavior.

In other words, viewers had to feel the emotions the characters were experiencing and feel like they knew what they were going through.

After watching the episode, viewers who identified with the characters reported that they felt more confident that they could discuss sexually transmitted diseases with their partner, friends and health care providers, Moyer-Gusé said.

“Those who identified with the characters were less likely to find faults with the story and were more likely to feel like they could talk about their sexual history, just like they saw on the program,” she said.

Another interesting finding was that, immediately after viewing the show, even those who saw the episode in which the characters discussed sexual health were not more likely than others to say they would discuss these issues with partners, friends or doctors.

“It took a while for the program to really have an effect. They may not have thought that watching the episode affected them, but in the end it did change their behavior,” she said.

The results of the study applied to both men and women who watched the program.

“While women probably watch Sex and the City more often than do men, it didn’t seem to bother the men in our study to watch the episode,”Moyer-Gusé said. “They had reactions that were very similar to what we found in women viewers.”

Source: Ohio State University

TV Shows Can Model Sexual Health Dialogue

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). TV Shows Can Model Sexual Health Dialogue. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/06/02/tv-shows-can-model-sexual-health-dialogue/26619.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.