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Brain Imaging May Improve Autism Diagnosis

Brain Imaging May Improve Autism DiagnosisA new study looks at the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain to document language impairment in autistic children, a step toward better diagnosis of the condition.

In the study, researchers performed fMRI exams on 15 control children and 12 language-impaired and age-matched autistic children. All the children were 12 years old.

Using fMRI, the researchers were able to measure neural activity in working brain tissues, while the children listened to recordings of their parents talking to them.

Results of their study appear online and in the upcoming August issue of Radiology.

Autism is a spectrum disorder characterized by repetitive behaviors and impaired language, communication and social interactions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is estimated that as many as one in every 110 children is affected by autism.

“With the extraordinarily high prevalence of autism, you would think there would be an objective diagnosis for the disorder,” said Joy Hirsch, Ph.D. “However, the diagnosis of autism currently remains limited to parent and clinician observation of missed developmental milestones.”

Brain activity was measured in two areas of the brain: the primary auditory cortex (A1) and superior temporal gyrus (STG), a region associated with sentence comprehension. Brain activation maps for each patient were then computed using statistical linear modeling.

Activity in the A1 region of the brain did not differ between autistic and control patients. However, activation within the STG was greater for control children relative to autistic patients.

“These findings first tell us that the autistic children in our study appeared normal with respect to the primary auditory system,” Hirsch said.

“But it appears that the STG in the autistic brains was not as sensitive to the language narratives as was the STG in the brains of the typical children.”

An additional 27 autistic children undergoing routine MRI exams with sedation were also included in the study. Using a similar analysis of sedation-adjusted values from the control group, the researchers identified 26 of 27 (96 percent) sedated autistic patients with autism.

“This study suggests that fMRI acquired during listening to a language narrative can be used to distinguish children with autism from those without,” Hirsch said. “Based on these initial findings, future studies using these or similar fMRI methods may result in an early and objective imaging indicator for autism.”

Some children with autism spectrum disorders can benefit from intensive behavior therapy, but early intervention is key.

“The need for an early, objective diagnosis is enormous,” Hirsch said.

Source: Radiological Society of North America

Brain Imaging May Improve Autism Diagnosis

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Brain Imaging May Improve Autism Diagnosis. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/06/01/brain-imaging-may-improve-autism-diagnosis/26599.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.