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Beliefs About Memory Are Often Wrong

Beliefs About Memory Are Usually Wrong According to experts, people are poor at predicting or acknowledging what they have learned — a belief that leads to poor judgments.

“There’s a disconnect among beliefs, judgments, and actual memory,” according to Williams College psychologist Nate Kornell. Ask people to predict how or what they will learn and “in many situations, they do a breathtakingly bad job.”

Why? A new study by Kornell and colleagues posits that we make predictions about memory based on how we feel while we’re encountering the information to be learned — and that can lead us astray. Our beliefs about our memory are often wrong.

The researchers conducted three experiments, each with about 80 participants from teenagers to senior citizens.

To test the relationships between “metamemory” — or beliefs and judgments about memory — and performance, they looked at two factors: the ease of processing information and the promise of future study opportunities.

The participants were serially shown words in large or small fonts and asked to predict how well they’d remember each. In one iteration of the experiment, they knew they’d have either one more chance or none to study the words; in another, three more chances or none. Afterwards, they were tested on their memory of the words.

As expected, font size affected judgment but not memory. Because the larger fonts felt more fluently processed, participants thought they’d be easier to remember. But they weren’t.

The number of study opportunities did affect memory — and the more repetitions, the better the performance. Participants predicted this would be so, but significantly underestimated the improvement additional study would yield. Belief affected judgment, but not much.

In a third experiment, participants were asked questions estimating the influence of font size and study on their learning. They still thought, incorrectly, that font size made a difference. But they were 10 times more sensitive to the number of study trials than in the earlier experiments.

This time, they based their answers on their beliefs, not their immediate experiences and judgments.

What fools us? First, “automatic processing”: “If something is easy to process, you assume you will remember it well,” says Kornell. Second, there’s the “stability bias”: “People act as though their memories will remain the same in the future as they are right now.” Wrong again.

Actually, “effortful processing” leads to more stable learning. And “the way we encode information is not based on ease; it’s based on meaning.” In other words, we remember what is meaningful to us.

It’s unlikely we’ll start checking our judgments every time we make one, says Kornell, “That’s too slow.” So we’ll just have to study more than we think we have to. And to preserve memories, we’d be wise to keep a journal.

The study will be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Beliefs About Memory Are Often Wrong

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Beliefs About Memory Are Often Wrong. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/03/23/beliefs-about-memory-are-often-wrong/24586.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.