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Teen Girls Benefit From Video Gaming with Parents

Teen Girls Benefit From Playing Video Games with FamilyIn a new study of 11- to 16-year-old kids, Brigham Young University researchers found girls who played video games with a parent seemed to profit in a variety of ways.

The girls behaved better, felt more connected to their families and had stronger mental health, said the scientists.

“The surprising part about this for me is that girls don’t play video games as much as boys,” said lead author Dr. Sarah Coyne. “But they did spend about the same amount of time co-playing with a parent as boys did.”

The study is found in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The findings come with one important caveat: The games had to be age-appropriate. If the game was rated M for mature, it weakened the statistical relationship between co-playing and family connectedness.

The study involved 287 families with an adolescent child. “Mario Kart,” “Mario Brothers,” “Wii Sports,” “Rock Band” and “Guitar Hero” topped the list of games played most often by girls.

“Call of Duty,” “Wii Sports” and “Halo” ranked 1, 2 and 3 among boys.

For boys, playing with a parent was not a statistically significant factor for any of the outcomes the researchers measured (positive behavior, aggression, family connection, mental health). Yet for girls, playing with a parent accounted for as much as 20 percent of the variation on those measured outcomes.

Coyne and her co-author Dr. Laura Padilla-Walker offer two possible explanations for what’s behind the gender differences.

“We’re guessing it’s a daddy-daughter thing, because not a lot of moms said yes when we asked them if they played video games,” Padilla-Walker said. “Co-playing is probably an indicator of larger levels of involvement.”

It’s also possible that the time boys play with parents doesn’t stand out as much because they spend far more time playing with friends.

The researchers plan to explore the basis of these gender differences in more detail as they continue working on this project.

Padilla-Walker remembers the outcry from gamers two years ago when this study linked frequent video game playing to poor relationships with friends and family.

Though she has a Ph.D. and expertise in analyzing statistical pathways, her most effective response to those critics is rooted in common sense.

“If you spend huge amounts of time absorbed in any activity, it’s going to affect your relationships,” Padilla-Walker said.

And that brings up practical parenting advice illustrated by the new study on playing video games with kids.

“Any face-to-face time you have with your child can be a positive thing, especially if the activity is something the child is interested in,” Padilla-Walker said.

Source: Brigham Young University

Teen Girls Benefit From Video Gaming with Parents

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Teen Girls Benefit From Video Gaming with Parents. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/02/02/teen-girls-benefit-from-video-gaming-with-parents/23116.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.