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Straightening Out Addicts Through Memory Work

Straightening Out Addicts Through Memory WorkResearchers know that people with addictions to stimulants tend to choose instant gratification or a smaller but sooner reward over a future benefit, even if the future reward is greater.

The perception of a reduced value for a future reward is termed “delayed discounting,” and overcoming it is one of the major challenges for treatment of addiction.

A new study in the journal Biological Psychiatry presents a strategy for increasing the value of future rewards in the minds of addicts.

“The hope is for a new intervention to help addicts,” said Warren K. Bickel, Ph.D., director of the Center for Substance Abuse at Virginia Tech.

Bickel and colleagues decided to test the possibility that increasing an individual’s ability to remember would decrease the discounting of future events. “In other words, we asked whether improved memory could result in a greater appreciation of a future reward,” said Bickel.

The results of a series of experiments presented a happy answer: Yes. “A change in discounting resulted from reinforced working memory training,” the researchers reported.

In this study, participants undergoing treatment for their stimulant use received either experimental or control memory training.

Experimental training consisted of working memory tasks with monetary reinforcement for performance – such as remembering a phone message and memorizing a list of words. Control Training consisted of the same tasks, but with answers provided so there was no memorization required.

Experimental participants received monetary rewards for their performance and the control participants received monetary rewards independent of their performance.

The researchers believe the study may be the first to demonstrate that neurocognitive training of working memory can decrease delay discounting.

The research article reports, “These findings support the competing neurobehavioral decision systems hypothesis of addiction (that) decisions are made on the basis of two decision systems.

“One, referred to as the impulsive decision system, is embodied in the limbic and paralimbic brain regions and is associated with the acquisition of more immediate reinforcers. The other, referred to as the executive system, is embodied in the prefrontal cortex and is associated with planning and deferred outcome.

“According to this hypothesis, addiction results from a hyperactive impulsive system and a hypoactive executive decision system. … (O)ur observed decrease in the rate of discounting following working memory training is consistent with an increase in relative activation of the executive system.”

The researchers conclude, “These changes in executive function are consistent with the notion of neuroplasticity and suggest that at least some of the neurocognitive deficits related to addiction might be reversible.”

They suggest future research address the durability of memory training, the ceiling effects of training, and the extent of improvement in treatment outcome.

In the journal’s Commentary, Bruce Wexler, of the Yale Department of Psychiatry, suggested the improvement in placing value on a future reward may be connected to the reward rather than working memory.

He endorsed treatment strategies that strengthen normally occurring processes — whether memory or the executive decision system — rather than simply address symptomatic behavior directly.

He wrote, “One goal of future studies will be to build on the valuable foundation provided by Bickel et al. in reporting the benefits of a (cognitive remediation treatment) approach for an addiction disorder.

“New studies should make explicit the cognitive process they aim to target—whether it is working memory, executive function more broadly, or control over financial reward— and include measures, as did Bickel et al., of the effects of treatment on the putative mediators.

“Future studies must also demonstrate reduction in the clinically problematic behavior to establish the value of the treatment.”

Source: Virginia Tech

Straightening Out Addicts Through Memory Work

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Straightening Out Addicts Through Memory Work. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2011/01/28/straightening-out-addicts-through-memory-work/22996.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.