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More Sex Cements Bonds for Neurotic Couples

More Sex Cements Bonds for Neurotic CouplesExperts — and the films of Woody Allen — have documented that neurotic individuals often have more difficulty with relationships and marriage. A new study further suggests the remedy may be lots of sex, at least for newlyweds.

In fact, researchers have determined if neurotic newlyweds have frequent sexual relations, their marital satisfaction is every bit as high as their less neurotic counterparts.

Neuroticism is the tendency to experience negative emotion, and people who are high in it get upset and irritated easily, are moody, and worry frequently. People who score high in neuroticism are less satisfied in romance and relationships, and when they get married they are more likely to divorce.

“High levels of neuroticism are more strongly associated with bad marital outcomes than any other personality factor,” said Michelle Russell and James McNulty, Ph.D., of the University of Tennessee, authors of the study.

But sex in marriage seems to make people happy—other research has shown that sexual interactions improved the next day’s mood. Russell and McNulty wanted to know if frequent sexual activity would erase the negative effects of neuroticism.

They followed 72 newlywed couples over the first four years of their marriage; both spouses reported — separately and privately — on their marital satisfaction and sexual frequency every six months.

On average, couples reported sexual intercourse about once a week during the first six months of marriage, and about 3 times a month by the fourth year of marriage. Couples were considered satisfied when they agreed that they “have a good marriage” and “My relationship with my partner makes me happy.”

Marital satisfaction was not associated with sexual frequency — not at the start of the marriage, or four years later. Highly satisfied marriages sometimes had high levels of sexual activity, and sometimes low levels — sexual contact alone was not a good indicator of marital satisfaction.

But Russell and McNulty found one important exception. For spouses with high levels of neuroticism, frequent sexual intercourse improved their marital satisfaction. The effect of frequent sexual activity was enough to completely wipe away the “happiness deficit” that neurotic spouses usually have.

“Frequent sex is one way that some neurotic people are able to maintain satisfying relationships,” the authors write.

The newlywed period is a time when sexual relations are particularly important, and for some—but not all—frequent sex improves their happiness with the marriage. This happiness-by–sex effect occurred regardless of how strong or happy the marriage was at the beginning of the study; frequent sex encourages marital happiness for neurotic newlyweds.

The study is found in the current Social Psychological and Personality Science (published by SAGE).

Source: SAGE Publications

More Sex Cements Bonds for Neurotic Couples

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). More Sex Cements Bonds for Neurotic Couples. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/12/09/more-sex-cements-bonds-for-neurotic-couples/21673.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.