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Gender Stereotypes Impact Financial Decisions

Gender Stereotypes Impact Financial DecisionsA new study infers that stereotypes appear to influence how women make financial decisions.

Women are generally thought to be less willing to take risks than men — a trait that helps women make safer and more cautious financial decisions.

Some research efforts have supported this premise, suggesting that the gender differences may be biologically rooted or evolutionarily programmed.

But Priyanka B. Carr, a doctoral candidate at Stanford University and Claude M. Steele, Ph.D., of Columbia University thought that these differences might be the result of negative stereotypes — stereotypes about women being irrational and illogical.

So they designed experiments to study how women make financial decisions, when faced with negative stereotypes and when not.

Past research has shown that being faced with negative stereotypes about one’s group can hamper intellectual performance, and Carr and Steele reasoned it could also affect financial decision-making.

In the experiments, they controlled whether the participants were made to think about negative stereotypes about women or not. Some volunteers were told that they would be completing tasks to measure their mathematical, logical, and rational reasoning abilities.  Since women are stereotyped as not being talented at these things, this should raise the stereotype in the volunteer’s mind.

To be very sure, these people were also asked to indicate their gender before doing the tasks. Other volunteers were told that they would be working on puzzles, and were not asked their gender first. Then, each person completed the same measures assessing their financial decision-making choices.

For example, in one experiment, people decided whether to choose risky but lucrative options (e.g., a 20 percent  chance of winning four dollars) over safer but less lucrative ones (e.g., an 80 percent chance of winning one dollar).

When the negative stereotype about women was not hinted at, there were no gender differences in financial decision-making. Both men and women were moderately risk averse and loss averse.

But when the negative stereotype was brought up, gender differences emerged.

Women made more cautious financial decisions: They were more likely to forgo lucrative opportunities so they could avoid risks and losses. Interestingly, when negative stereotypes about women (and therefore positive stereotypes about men) were relevant, men became more risk-seeking.

The stereotypical cues encouraged behavior that stuck to the stereotype. This suggests that earlier findings and anecdotes about differences in decision making between the sexes may actually be the result of gender stereotypes (and not the basis for them).

In the world of business and finance, risk taking (which can yield big rewards) is often valued, though it can also result in bad outcomes (as implied by the current economic crisis).

Carr says that to create more temperate financial-decision making there may be no need in banks and on Wall Street for a “battle of riskiness between the sexes.”

Reducing and removing negative stereotypes about women can leave both men and women free to make decisions they think are best. She says, “Our argument is that people’s decision-making and financial choices should not be burdened by stereotypes being placed on them.”

This study may be found in the journal Psychological Science.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Gender Stereotypes Impact Financial Decisions

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Gender Stereotypes Impact Financial Decisions. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/11/18/gender-stereotypes-impact-financial-decisions/21034.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.