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Sleep Helps Collect Thoughts

A new study suggests that sleep may help individuals remember a newly learned word and incorporate new vocabulary into their “mental lexicon.”

In the investigation, researchers taught volunteers new words in the evening, followed by an immediate test.

The volunteers slept overnight in the laboratory while their brain activity was recorded using an electroencephalogram, or EEG.

A test the following morning revealed that they could remember more words than they did immediately after learning them, and they could recognize them faster demonstrating that sleep had strengthened the new memories.

This did not occur in a control group of volunteers who were trained in the morning and retested in the evening, with no sleep in between.

An examination of the sleep volunteers’ brainwaves showed that deep sleep (slow-wave sleep) rather than rapid eye movement (REM) sleep or light sleep helped in strengthening the new memories.

When the researchers examined whether the new words had been integrated with existing knowledge in the mental lexicon, they discovered the involvement of a different type of activity in the sleeping brain.

Sleep spindles are brief but intense bursts of brain activity that reflect information transfer between different memory stores in the brain — the hippocampus deep in the brain and the neocortex, the surface of the brain.

Memories in the hippocampus are stored separately from other memories, while memories in the neocortex are connected to other knowledge. Volunteers who experienced more sleep spindles overnight were more successful in connecting the new words to the rest of the words in their mental lexicon, suggesting that the new words were communicated from the hippocampus to the neocortex during sleep.

Co-author of the paper, Professor Gareth Gaskell, of the University of York’s department of psychology, said: “We suspected from previous work that sleep had a role to play in the reorganization of new memories, but this is the first time we’ve really been able to observe it in action, and understand the importance of spindle activity in the process.”

These results highlight the importance of sleep and the underlying brain processes for expanding vocabulary. But the same principles are likely to apply to other types of learning.

Lead author, Dr. Jakke Tamminen, said: “New memories are only really useful if you can connect them to information you already know. Imagine a game of chess, and being told that the rule governing the movement of a specific piece has just changed.

“That new information is only useful to you once you can modify your game strategy, the knowledge of how the other pieces move, and how to respond to your opponent’s moves. Our study identifies the brain activity during sleep that organizes new memories and makes those vital connections with existing knowledge.”

Source: University of York

Sleep Helps Collect Thoughts

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Sleep Helps Collect Thoughts. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/11/03/sleep-helps-collect-thoughts/20502.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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