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Parents More Important than School in Child’s Education

Parents More Important than School in Child's Education A provocative new study by UK researchers has concluded that parents’ efforts toward their child’s educational achievements are crucial.

In fact, the investigators found the role of parental involvement is more significant than that of the school or child.

This research by Professor Gianni De Fraja and Tania Oliveira from the University of Leicester and Luisa Zanchi, of the Leeds University Business School, has been published in the latest issue of the MIT-based Review of Economics and Statistics.

The researchers found that parents’ effort is more important for a child’s educational attainment than the school’s effort, which in turn is more important than the child’s own effort.

The study found that the socioeconomic background of a family not only affected the child’s educational attainment – it also affected the school’s effort.

Researcher Professor De Fraja, who is head of economics at the University of Leicester, said: “The main channel through which parental socioeconomic background affects achievement is via effort.

“Parents from a more advantaged environment exert more effort, and this influences positively the educational attainment of their children.

“By the same token, the parents’ background also increases the school’s effort, which increases the school achievement. Why schools work harder where parents are from a more privileged background we do not know. It might be because middle class parents are more vocal in demanding that the school works hard.”

Professor De Fraja added: “We found that children work harder whose parents put more effort into their education.

“In general, the efforts exerted by the three groups of agents — parents, school and child — affect one another. On the other hand, the propensity of children to exert effort is not influenced by their social background. Children from better-off households do not necessarily try harder than those from less advantaged backgrounds.

“Interestingly, there is a tradeoff between the number of children and their parents’ effort: the number of siblings influences the effort exerted by that child’s parents towards that child’s education. If a child grows up in a more numerous family, he or she receives less effort from parents.”

Professor De Fraja said the results suggest that parents are very important for educational achievement: “In general, what we are saying is that a child whose parents put more effort into his or her education does better at school.

“Therefore policies that aim at improving parental effort might be effective in strengthening educational attainment. Influencing parental effort is certainly something that is much easier than modifying their social background.”

Source: University of Leicester

Parents More Important than School in Child’s Education

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Parents More Important than School in Child’s Education. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/11/02/parents-more-important-than-school-in-childs-education/20448.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.