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Do Women Have A Special Connection to Nature?

Do Women Have A Special Connection to Nature? A new field of study is ecopsychology, or the relationship between environmental issues and mental health and well-being.

A new journal issue explores the premise that women experience and interact with their natural surroundings in ways that differ from men.

The way in which those differences affect a woman’s sense of self, body image, and drive to protect and preserve the environment are explored in a special issue of the journal Ecopsychology.

Guest editors Britain Scott, PhD and Lisa Lynch, PhD, present a collection of articles that encompass observations and theories on how female gender, motherhood, human nature, and gender-based societal norms influence a woman’s self-perception and behavior.

Topics focus on what women may gain from interacting with their surroundings on a sensory level and how they may benefit from nature-based therapies.

In the article “Babes and the Woods: Women’s Objectification and the Feminine Beauty Ideal as Ecological Hazards,” Dr. Scott explains how cultural norms that promote a view of women as sex objects have led women to become preoccupied with, and generally critical of, their bodies.

This feeling among women that they fall short of the feminine beauty ideal has a negative impact on their attitude toward, and ability to connect with, the environment.

Kari Hennigan, PhD, suggests that women who spend time in natural settings and interact with the environment are more likely to have a better body image and to distance themselves from societal definitions of beauty.

Susan Logsdon-Conradsen, PhD and Sarah Allred, PhD, describe the concept of environmental mother-activism, which is based on the supposition that a woman’s mothering instincts extends to a desire to protect and preserve the environmental for her children.

In the article “Motherhood and Environmental Activism: A Developmental Framework,” the authors propose that motherhood stimulates activist behavior, with environmental activism being one example of this transformation.

In “The Heroine in the Underworld: An Ecopsychological Perspective on the Myth of Inanna,” the author describes how the theme of people’s perceived connections with the Earth and their local community, drawn from the myth, can be used as a model for rebuilding relationships and restoring positive communication.

Souirce: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Do Women Have A Special Connection to Nature?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Do Women Have A Special Connection to Nature?. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/11/01/do-women-have-a-special-connection-to-nature/20396.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.