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New Dopamine Model Aids Treatment of Schizophrenia and Addiction

New Dopamine Model Aids Treatment of Schizophrenia and AddictionA new model of the way the brain releases dopamine may be useful for understanding drug addiction and in the treatment of schizophrenia.

Dopamine is an important chemical involved in transmitting signals between nerve cells.

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen believe the model will be an important tool in helping scientists understand how we learn and how the brain perceives reward and punishment.

It is hoped that the model can be used to understand drug addiction and in the treatment of schizophrenia. The study is the cover article in the Oct. 20th, 2010 Journal of Neuroscience.

In the brain, dopamine is involved in a number of processes that control the way we behave. If an action results in the substance being released, we are more likely to repeat the action. This applies to actions such as eating, sexual intercourse or winning a competition.

However, the same also holds true when individuals take harmful narcotics. Scientists believe that mental illnesses such as schizophrenia can be linked to dopamine imbalances.

If an action leads to a better response than expected, the brain will temporarily release more dopamine. If the response is worse than expected, the brain momentarily stops releasing dopamine. This mechanism is responsible for our tendency to repeat actions that have given us a high level of dopamine, and to avoid those that result in lower dopamine levels.

“That’s why many see dopamine as a learning signal,” says postdoctoral researcher Jakob Kisbye Dreyer of the department of neuroscience and pharmacology, who was involved with the module’s creation.

“Others have argued that it is impossible for the dopamine system to react quickly enough to be a part of our learning process. It can take a split second to learn something, but a cell that releases dopamine works slowly. If you look at a lighthouse that flashes at a slow frequency, you might not notice right away that the light was turned off.

“Likewise, the arguments against dopamine as an aid to learning have focused on the slow feedback time when you experience something bad, and that it is too slow for the brain to make a connection. Our model shows that the collective signal from many cells provides a rapid enough reaction to influence learning.”

One of the biggest challenges faced by neurologists is that it is difficult to study active brains in living humans.

“Theoretical neuroscience can easily become very complicated,” Dreyer says. “If we try to come up with complete explanations of the way the brain works, we get models that are so complex that they are difficult to test.”

The dopamine model’s predictions, created as part of a unique collaborative effort among physicists, mathematicians and neurobiologists, are supported by observations made in animal models.

“Different branches of natural science have surprisingly different ways of thinking,” Dreyer says.

Source: University of Copenhagen

New Dopamine Model Aids Treatment of Schizophrenia and Addiction

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). New Dopamine Model Aids Treatment of Schizophrenia and Addiction. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 14, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/21/new-dopamine-model-aids-treatment-of-schizophrenia-and-addiction/19909.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.