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Gene Therapy for Depression Has Potential

A new report says animal and human data suggest gene therapy to the brain may be able to treat patients with major depression who do not respond to traditional drug treatment.

The researchers hope to rapidly translate their findings into a human clinical trial using the same kind of gene therapy modality the investigators have pioneered to treat Parkinson’s disease.

A 45-patient randomized blinded phase II multicenter clinical trial using the gene therapy to treat Parkinson’s has recently ended and results are being readied for publication.

“Given our findings, we potentially have a novel therapy to target what we now believe is one root cause of human depression,” says the study’s senior investigator, Dr. Michael Kaplitt.

Current therapies for depression treat symptoms but not underlying causes, and while that works for many patients, those with advanced depression, or depression that does not respond to medication, could hopefully benefit from our new approach,” adds Dr. Kaplitt.

The Science Translational Medicine study demonstrates that a brain protein known as p11 in a single, small brain area, the nucleus accumbens, is critical to the feelings of reward and pleasure that are often missing in depression.

This brain region had primarily been studied in addiction research, but the inability to find satisfaction with positive life experiences is one of the major sources of disability in depression.

While investigators believe that depression is a complex disorder that likely involves a number of brain areas and neural circuits, they say their findings suggest that restoring p11 may significantly alter the course of depression in humans.

“Applying molecular neurobiology and gene therapy to depression could dramatically alter the approach to psychiatric diseases,” Dr. Kaplitt says.

“Our results provide further evidence that the underlying causes of psychiatric disorders are due to molecular changes in key brain circuits, so that they are much more similar to common neurological disorders — such as Parkinson’s disease — that might be helped by restoring molecular function.”

The report by researchers at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center is found in the October issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Source: New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College

Gene Therapy for Depression Has Potential

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Gene Therapy for Depression Has Potential. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 25, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/21/gene-therapy-for-depression-has-potential/19911.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.