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Latinas Avoid Cancer Screening

A new review suggests fatalism may prevent women of Latin American descent — Latinas — from using cancer screening services.

Karla Espinosa and Dr. Linda Gallo’s research discovered women who are pessimistic about preventive health practices and disease outcomes are less likely to have been screened for cervical, breast and colorectal cancer.

Latinas have some of the lowest cancer screening rates in the United States. They are also more likely than non-Latino Whites to believe that cancer cannot be prevented and that death is inevitable after diagnosis.

Such beliefs are likely to result in few perceived benefits to screening. Fatalism may therefore be an important factor in explaining the underutilization of cancer screening services among Latinas.

The authors reviewed eleven quantitative studies measuring the relationship between fatalism and Latinas’ cancer screening behavior.

The aim was to understand how significant a factor this relationship is in predicting participation in cancer screening, over the influence of low socioeconomic status and often limited access to health care in this group. Eight of the 11 studies looked at cervical cancer screening, seven at breast cancer screening and one at colorectal cancer screening.

To assess whether they were fatalistic, women were asked to what extent they agreed or disagreed with statements such as “cancer is like a death sentence,” “cancer is God’s punishment,” “illness is a matter of chance,” “there is little that I can do to prevent cancer,” “it does not do any good to try to change the future because the future is in the hands of God.”

The researchers found that seven of the 11 studies reported a statistically significant inverse association between fatalism and utilization of cancer screening services.

This suggests that fatalism may indeed act as a barrier to cancer screening, taking into account socioeconomic status and access to health services.

However, the authors caution that additional research is necessary to enhance our understanding of the relationships among socioeconomic and structural barriers to health services, fatalism, and cancer screening behavior.

“Improving our understanding of the importance of fatalism in explaining underutilization of cancer screening services among Latinas may drive the development of more effective and culturally appropriate interventions to reduce ethnic disparities in cancer,” concluded the authors.

The research is published online in Springer’s International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Source: Springer

Latinas Avoid Cancer Screening

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Latinas Avoid Cancer Screening. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/19/latinas-avoid-cancer-screening/19767.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.