Home » News » Stimulation Aids Name Recall

Stimulation Aids Name Recall

A researcher dedicated to understanding human memory has discovered an intervention that helps one remember an individual’s name.

Ingrid Olson found that electric stimulation of the right anterior temporal lobe of the brain improved the recall of proper names in young adults by 11 percent.

“We know a lot about how to make people’s memory worse, but we don’t know very much about how to make people’s memory better,” said Olson.

“These findings hold promise because they point to possible therapeutic treatments for memory rehabilitation following a stroke or other neurological insult.”

Olson is currently conducting a followup study in older adults, in collaboration with David Wolk at the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Memory Center. Because memory decline is part of normal aging, the difficulty in remembering proper names is exacerbated as we get older.

Olson predicts that the memory gain will be even more significant among the older research subjects because they start with a lower baseline recall level.

For the study, subjects received electric stimulation to their anterior temporal lobes while looking at photos of faces of known or semi-famous people and landmarks. Her findings support previous research suggesting that the anterior temporal lobes are critically involved in the retrieval of people’s names.

She did not find any improvement in the recall of the names of the landmarks.

The electrical stimulation was delivered using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a technique by which small electric currents (e.g., 1-2 milliamps) are applied to the scalp via electrodes. Depending on the desired effect, the small currents can either temporarily disrupt or enhance brain functions in a localized brain region.

According to Olson, it is important to distinguish tDCS from electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), made famous in movies such as “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” ECT is used to treat serious mental illnesses by passing pulses of approximately 1 ampere of electricity into the brain in order to provoke a seizure.

By contrast, tDCS uses a much smaller current (e.g. 1-2 milliamps) with effects that typically last just one hour. The technique is painless, and there are no known adverse effects.

“As we age, the connections between the neurons in our brains weaken,” said Olson.

“In our study, tDCS works by increasing the likelihood that the right neurons will fire at the moment when the research subject is trying to retrieve a particular name,” she said.

“One question for further research is whether or not repeating tDCS may lead to longer lasting effects,” she said.

Her study appears this month in the journal Neuropsychologia.

Source: Temple University

Stimulation Aids Name Recall

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Stimulation Aids Name Recall. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/07/stimulation-aids-name-recall/19299.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.