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High Turnover among Women Executives

High Turnover among Women Executives As women become more ingrained in the workforce and take leadership positions, a new study discovers women leave their jobs more frequently than men.

In fact, researchers determined female executives are more than twice as likely to leave their jobs — voluntarily and involuntarily — as men.

However, despite systemic evidence that women are more likely to depart from their positions, the researchers did not find strong patterns of discrimination.

Lead author John Becker-Blease, an assistant professor of finance at Oregon State University, and his co-authors analyzed data from Standard & Poor’s 1,500 firms.

They classified departures as voluntary or involuntary based on careful examination of public news accounts accompanying an executive’s departure.

“Departures of powerful female executives, as we saw with Carly Fiorina and Patricia Dunn at Hewlett-Packard, are often high-profile news events,” Becker-Blease said.

“Despite these very public departures, relatively little is really known about women executives, whether they are more likely to depart or be fired than men, and the reasons for their departures.”

About 7.2 percent of women executives in the survey left their jobs, compared to 3.8 percent of men. Both the voluntary rates (4.3 percent versus 2.8 percent for men) and the involuntary rates (2.9 versus 0.9 percent) were higher for women executives.

“We really had to dig deep to tease out any systematic patterns behind these departures,” Becker-Blease said.

“We did find that women were slightly more likely to leave smaller firms, and firms with more male-dominated boards, but this was a small effect size.”

Becker-Blease said research has shown that women are more likely to leave a job due to domestic or social responsibilities than men, which could explain the higher voluntary departure rate.

As for the higher rate of being dismissed from a job, Becker-Blease said research suggests that women at the middle levels of management may not be getting the kind of opportunities and professional support that they need to advance successfully to the top ranks.

“Recent research offers some intriguing evidence suggesting that while the market may seem to perceive women as less capable business leaders, the disparity isn’t really about gender, but about the experience those women bring to the table,” Becker-Blease said.

“It’s likely that as more and more women earn opportunities at mid- and upper-level management, this will translate into more opportunities for successful stints as executives.”

In addition, he said companies with female executives tend to help “grease the wheel” for other women to rise in the ranks, but women CEOs are still rare. A 2009 report showed only 13 women CEOs among Fortune 500 companies.

“Women benefit from women in positions of leadership,” Becker-Blease said.

“Our study contributes to the small body of work out there on women at the executive level. I think it is reasonably good news for women, in that we did not find evidence of discrimination at an obvious level, but the different rates of departure from the executive ranks is troubling.”

The study is featured in October’s issue of Economic Inquiry.

Source: Oregon State University

High Turnover among Women Executives

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). High Turnover among Women Executives. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 20, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/05/high-turnover-among-women-executives/19179.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.