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Social Exclusion Drives Bad Choices

Social Exclusion Drives Bad ChoicesA new study reveals people who feel excluded will go to any length to try to become part of a group. The desire to be accepted or be a member of an “in” group can include spending large sums of cash, eating something dicey, or doing illicit drugs.

“Social exclusion prompts people to use money and consumption in the service of affiliation,” write a multi-national team of authors.

Examples of the behavior include:

“An elderly man loses his life savings to a fraudulent telemarketer, who obtained access to the man’s bank account information by preying on the man’s social isolation.

“After transferring to a new university where she doesn’t know anyone, a young woman goes into debt when she goes on a wildly lavish vacation with a popular group of girls.

“An unpopular girl uses illicit drugs in hopes of gaining entrance into a seemingly exclusive social club.

What do these situations have in common?” the authors ask.

Excluded people look to the social environment for cues on how to fit in, and then they flexibly and strategically use consumption to help them commence new social relationships, the authors explain.

In their experiments, the authors induced participants to feel socially accepted or excluded and then assessed how their spending and consumption patterns changed.

In one study, people were paired with partners who left the study. People who thought their partners left because they disliked them were more willing to spend money on school spirit wristbands than people who thought their partners left for an appointment.

People who feel left out are willing to engage in personally distasteful (or even harmful) consumption in order to fit in.

“In one experiment, excluded individuals were willing to pay more than others for chicken feet, an unappealing food item liked by their Asian partner,” the authors write.

“In a subsequent experiment, participants who recalled an experience of social exclusion expressed an increased willingness to snort cocaine.”

Source: University of Chicago Press Journals

Social Exclusion Drives Bad Choices

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Social Exclusion Drives Bad Choices. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 26, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/09/21/social-exclusion-drives-bad-choices/18475.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.