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New Perspective Improves Self-Control

New Perspective Improves Self-ControlSome would argue that our ability to self-control is on the wane as increasing ranks of obesity and substance abuse permeate our society.

However, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research says there’s hope — we just need a little help to see self-regulation as fun.

“Self-control failures depend on whether people see activities involving self-control (e.g., eating in moderate quantities) as an obligation to work or an opportunity to have fun,” says University of Miami’s Juliano Laran and Chris Janiszewski, University of Florida, Gainesville.

According to the authors, approximately one in five U.S. citizens over the age of 12 admits to binge drinking at least once per month, and nearly 10 million people suffer from clinical eating disorders. These epidemics make it critical to examine what can be done to encourage people to regulate consumption.

In one study, the researchers asked participants to hold pieces of candy between their fingers, and put it in their mouths and then take it out.

“The goal of this task was to let people perform tasks with the candy but not be able to actually eat the candy,” the authors explain.

Once the participants completed the initial tasks they moved on to taking unrelated surveys. But the candy was left on their desks without instruction as to whether they could eat it or not.

The researchers measured how much candy the participants consumed and measured how much self-control the participants usually exerted.

“We found that participants who are usually high in self-control perceived the initial candy task—which involved touching, but not eating Skittles and M&Ms—as an opportunity to have fun (they were playing with candy),” the authors write.

“Participants who are usually low in self-control, however, perceived the initial candy task as an obligation to work.”

Both low and high self-control individuals showed self-control success in a similar study where the word “fun” was included in the instructions for the initial task.

“These results show that low self-control people can be made to act like high self-control people and show regulatory success if tasks that involve exerting self-control are framed in a way that people will perceive it as fun and not work,” the authors conclude.

Source: University of Chicago Press Journals

New Perspective Improves Self-Control

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). New Perspective Improves Self-Control. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/09/21/new-perspective-improves-self-control/18481.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.