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Adversity Aids Management of Chronic Pain

A new study suggests experiencing some hardships in life can help an individual manage chronic pain.

These individuals experience less physical impairment and spend less time in doctor’s offices or health clinics, says the study’s author, Mark Seery, PhD.

Seery emphasizes that the key to the benefit is the experience of “some” prior adverse events as opposed to many or none at all.

“This study of 396 adults with chronic back pain (CBP) found that those with some lifetime adversity reported less physical impairment, disability and heavy utilization of health care than those who had experienced either no adversity or a high level of adversity,” Seery explains.

“The data suggest that adversity-exposure also may protect against psychiatric disturbances that occur with CBP,” Seery says, “and additional analyses found no alternative explanations of our findings.”

The study sample was drawn from a nationally representative Web-enabled, population-based panel created through traditional probability sampling techniques such as random-digit dialing by Knowledge Networks, Inc.

The subjects had previously acknowledged a history of CBP when reporting their physical health status in an online survey.

They completed a survey of lifetime exposure to 37 adverse events, including one’s own or a loved one’s illness/injury, sexual and non-sexual violence, bereavement, social or environmental stress, disaster and various relationship stresses.

Subjects subsequently reported self-rated functional impairment, disabled employment status, frequency of back pain treatment, prescription painkiller use and whether they currently sought treatment for comorbid psychiatric disorders.

The researchers speculate that observed patterns of relationships between adversity and CBP-related outcomes may reflect the possibility that resilience, a phenomenon largely ignored in previous CBP research, is occurring.

“It appears,” says Seery, “that adversity may promote the development of psychological and social resources that help one tolerate adversity, which in this case leads to better CBP-related outcomes. It may be that the experience of prior, low-levels of adversity may cause sufferers to reappraise stressful and potentially debilitating symptoms of CBP as minor annoyances that do not substantially interfere with life.”

Seery says that previous attempts to understand the persistence, refractoriness and disability associated with CBP have underscored the importance of psychosocial variables and demonstrated an association between CBP and lifetime exposure to adverse events.

“Previous research suggests that exposure to adverse life events correlates with greater CBP severity,” he says.

“This implies that the optimal situation would be one in which individuals have not been exposed to any adverse lifetime events.

“It appears, however, that the relationship between adversity and chronic pain is not so simple, in that experiencing some prior adversity is actually most beneficial,” Seery says.

Source: University of Buffalo

Adversity Aids Management of Chronic Pain

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Adversity Aids Management of Chronic Pain. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 17, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/08/06/adversity-aids-management-of-chronic-pain/16511.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.