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ECG Predicts Success of Medications Used in Schizophrenia

ECG Predicts Success of Medications Used in Schizophrenia Prescribing medication always involves a calculated risk. An adverse drug reaction may occur or the medication may fail to work because of particular body chemistry.

A new study suggests a common electroencephalography (EEG) test may hold the key to predicting whether a person will respond to certain prescribed drugs, particularly those related to psychiatric conditions.

Engineering and health sciences researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada applied machine learning to EEG patterns and successfully predicted how patients with schizophrenia would respond to clozapine therapy.

Clozapine is recognized as an effective treatment for chronic medication-resistant schizophrenia but can produce serious side effects such as seizures, cardiac arrhythmias or bone marrow suppression. Some patients can develop blood problems that are life-threatening. Weekly to monthly blood sampling is required.

“Some people can suffer terrible side effects from clozapine,” said Dr. Gary Hasey, associate professor at McMaster and director of the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation laboratory at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Mood Disorders Clinic in Hamilton.

“The logistic difficulties for the patient and treatment team are also substantial. A method to reliably determine, before the onset of therapy, whether a patient will or will not respond to clozapine would greatly assist the clinician in determining whether the risks and logistic complexity of clozapine are outweighed by the potential benefits.”

The study will be published in the journal Clinical Neurophysiology.

To conduct the study, EEGs were taken from 23 patients diagnosed with medication-resistant schizophrenia before they began taking clozapine. Twelve were men and 11 were women, all of middle age.

The brainwave patterns and response to the clozapine therapy of these patients were used to “train” a computer algorithm to predict whether a specific patient will respond to the drug. The prediction accuracy was approximately 89 percent. This algorithm showed similar predictive accuracy when it was further tested in a new group of 14 additional patients treated with clozapine.

“The computational power available today supports new machine learning methodologies that can help doctors better diagnose and treat illness and disease,” said Prof. Reilly. “Large amounts of data can be processed very quickly to identify patterns or predict outcomes. We’re looking forward to applying the findings to other areas.”

EEG records the brain’s electrical activity close to the scalp. Traditionally, it has been used to monitor for epilepsy, and to diagnose coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. EEG is still often used as a first-line method to diagnose tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders.

“EEG is an inexpensive, non-invasive technique widely available in smaller hospitals and in community laboratories,” explains Dr. MacCrimmon. “Also, EEG readings take only 20 to 30 minutes of a patient’s time, with no preparation required, so pose minimal inconvenience.”

Source: McMaster University

ECG Predicts Success of Medications Used in Schizophrenia

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). ECG Predicts Success of Medications Used in Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/08/05/ecg-predicts-success-of-medications-used-in-schizophrenia/16452.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.