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Child Obesity Must Address Mother’s Weight Issues

Child Obesity Must Address Mothers Weight IssuesA task force has come to the conclusion that mothers must overcome their weight problems in order to slow childhood obesity.

The report was given by the Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance Task Force on Women at a meeting on Capitol Hill.

According to task force members, the information gap and general lack of understanding of obesity’s unique and disproportionate impact on women contributes to the challenges of the 65 million American women who are considered overweight or obese.

Through discussions with health experts and an extensive review of obesity prevalence research, the task force found women to be hit hardest by obesity — confounding efforts to turn the tide on the nation’s obesity problem, especially in children.

“We rely on women to serve as the ‘Chief Health Officer’ for the family, but with more than a third being obese themselves, we’re unlikely to break the cycle with children without finding ways for moms to overcome their weight problems as well,” said Christine Ferguson, professor at The George Washington University and Director of the STOP Obesity Alliance.

“What’s more, achieving healthier weights for women, whether they are mothers or not, will mean a healthier society overall. Unfortunately, significant barriers stand in the way.”

The STOP Obesity Alliance Task Force on Women identified the following four areas that have a significant impact on weight and obesity in women:

  • The physiological, psychological, cultural and socioeconomic factors of obesity that disproportionately affect women as well as the unique impact of overweight and obesity in women at various points in their lives, including but not limited to puberty, pregnancy and menopause.
  • Pervasive racial and ethnic disparities in obesity prevalence and health outcomes among minority women, particularly African-American, Hispanic and Native American women.
  • Systemic, gender-based biases portrayed in the media and encountered in educational, workplace, social and health care environments, including a focus on redefining and maintaining healthy weight goals based on health rather than societal norms or unrealistic body image ideals.
  • Expectations for women as caretakers and the role they play in influencing and shaping the health behaviors and decisions of their families, especially their children.

The Alliance’s Task Force on Women includes nearly 20 influential health advocacy organizations and aims to promote discussion among decisionmakers to look at strategies that will improve the health of overweight and obese American women and their families.

“This is the first step down an important path – a path that we hope will reap significant and immediate benefits in reducing the risks and consequences of obesity for women and their families,” said Ferguson.

Source: Chandler Chicco Agency

Child Obesity Must Address Mother’s Weight Issues

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Child Obesity Must Address Mother’s Weight Issues. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/22/child-obesity-must-address-mothers-weight-issues/15892.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.