Home » News » Insights on Loss of Working Memory

Insights on Loss of Working Memory

Insights on Loss of Working Memory Scientists are studying a genetic disease to gain insights on working memory, i.e., the ability to hold and manipulate information in your mind.

The disease, neurofibromatosis type 1, or NF1 is characterized by a loss of working memory. The condition affects one in 3,500 people and is the most common cause of learning disabilities.

New research by UCLA scientist has uncovered new clues about how NF1 disrupts memory and how medications may be created to correct NF1-related learning disabilities.

The research is published in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

NF1 is caused by mutations in a gene called neurofibromin, or Nf1, which makes a protein with the same name.

Previous animal studies led by principal investigator Dr. Alcino Silva, a professor of neurobiology and psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, showed that the Nf1 protein is essential for controlling the release of a neurotransmitter called GABA, which regulates brain cell activity. Mutated versions of the protein cause too much GABA to be released, dramatically altering communication between brain cells.

In the current study, Silva and colleagues found that mice carrying Nf1 mutations showed higher levels of GABA in the brain region that regulates working memory.

The findings imply that excess GABA hinders the activity of neurons in the brain, thus interfering with working memory.

“We focused on a region of the prefrontal cortex that is critical for working memory in mice and compared it to its equivalent region in humans,” said study co-author Carrie Bearden, an associate professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA.

“When NF1 patients performed tasks that required working memory, they displayed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex. The results were very similar to what we discovered in our mouse model.”

The team asked NF1 patients to perform a series of memory tasks while undergoing a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan that measured blood and oxygen flow to various areas of the brain. More blood and oxygen flow indicates greater brain activity. Compared to healthy volunteers, the NF1 patients showed less activity in the part of the prefrontal cortex that controls working memory.

“The NF1 patients’ brain cells didn’t fully activate in the prefrontal cortex, as in healthy people,” Bearden said.

“Patients’ brain activity levels also predicted their success rate in the experiment. The less activity we saw in this brain region, the worse they performed on the tasks.”

“Our research implies that the increased release of GABA interferes with working memory in NF1,” said the study’s first author, Carrie Shilyansky, a graduate researcher in neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

The UCLA findings suggest that learning disabilities caused by Nf1 mutations could potentially be corrected with a drug that normalizes the excess GABA’s effect on brain cells.

The authors are currently studying the effect of the drug lovastatin on learning and health issues in NF1 patients.

Source: UCLA

Insights on Loss of Working Memory

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Insights on Loss of Working Memory. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/19/insights-on-loss-of-working-memory/15748.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.