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Telephone Care Eases Depression Associated with Cancer

Telephone Care Eases Depression Associated with CancerTreatment of cancer often is associated with pain and depression. Sadly, these symptoms often are often unrecognized and undertreated.

New research advocates centralized telephone-based care management coupled with automated symptom monitoring, to improve social support and reduce depression.

The Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression (INCPAD) study combined automated calls with followup calls from the nurse care manager to reduce pain and depression in cancer patients.

Calls were made to individuals with all types of cancers seen by rural and urban community-based oncology physicians.

The improved outcomes of the patients who received the telephone-based care management and the feasibility of this approach is reported in the July 14, 2010, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

“Because oncologists are busy with testing, chemotherapy and other treatments, they often have too little time left for quality of life issues, like pain and depression. We felt one solution might be a partnership between a telephone-based symptom management team and community-based oncology practices.

“We found that an economical, centralized approach is feasible to conduct and significantly improved symptoms of both depression and pain in patients in any phase of cancer from newly diagnosed to long-term to recurrent to cancer-free,” said Kurt Kroenke, M.D., the study’s principal investigator.

An INCPAD nurse manager reviewed the data collected from the automated symptom monitoring phone calls that, for example, instructed the patients to rate their depression and pain on scales of 1 to 10.

This data allowed the nurse’s phone contacts to be more efficient by targeting areas needing attention. Although most study participants, whose average age was 59, elected automated surveillance calls, they also were offered an option to participate online in this aspect of the study.

“Technology, in the form of automated calls repeated until an adequate treatment response occurred, allowed us to gather data on symptom severity at a time convenient for the patient, making the process very patient-centered. It also allowed the nurse manager to work at a higher level to improve the quality of life of these cancer patients.
And it gave these patients, many of whom lived in underserved rural areas, one-stop assistance they probably wouldn’t have had access to unless they went to a major cancer center,” said Dr. Kroenke, who is a research scientist with the Center for Implementing Evidence-Based Practice at the Richard Roudebush VA Medical Center.

Source: Indiana University

Telephone Care Eases Depression Associated with Cancer

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Telephone Care Eases Depression Associated with Cancer. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/15/telephone-care-eases-depression-associated-with-cancer/15622.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.