advertisement
Home » News » Abnormal Side Effects from Parkinson Meds Explained

Abnormal Side Effects from Parkinson Meds Explained

For years, a small set of Parkinson patients have experienced a bizarre side effect from medications that changes personality and provokes risky behavior.

Now, scientists at UCL (University College London) believe they have explained the risky behavior, an insight that has implications for future medication of patients.

The standard treatments for Parkinson’s disease, which work by increasing dopamine signalling in the brain, can trigger highly risky behaviors, known as ‘impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviors’ (ICBs) in approximately five to 10 percent of patients.

New results, published today in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, uncover a possible explanation for this behavior – impaired self-control combined with surprisingly normal motivation. Researchers have shown that Parkinson’s patients with ICBs are much more willing to take immediate but smaller benefits rather than waiting for larger ones in the future.

“Some patients end up gambling away their life savings while others run up huge credit card debts. This work sheds light on the reasons behind such behaviors, and may help to treat sufferers of Parkinson’s disease in the future,” said Charlotte Housden who carried out the work at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, and is now at the University of Cambridge.

Researchers studied a group of 36 Parkinson’s disease patients, half of whom had ICBs, and compared them to a group of 20 elderly volunteers without Parkinson’s disease. All the participants completed two tests: a computer game that measured motivation, on which the participants attempted to win cash by responding quickly and learning associations between pictures and money; and a questionnaire about financial decisions.

This questionnaire measured a form of impulsivity called “delay discounting,” by asking whether someone would prefer receiving a smaller payment quickly, as opposed to waiting for a larger payment. For example, would you prefer to receive £50 today or £80 in a month’s time?

The data revealed a clear pattern of results. Against the researchers’ expectations, the Parkinson’s patients who suffered from ICBs were not more motivated to win money on the computer game than the control volunteers. They were also no better at learning about which stimuli predicted money. On the other hand, they were considerably more likely to choose smaller immediate payments over larger but delayed ones on the questionnaire.

Dr. Jonathan Roiser, from the UCL Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, and supervisor of the study said: “The pattern of more impulsive choices together with intact motivation and learning suggests that ICBs may be mediated by impaired self-control, and not excessive motivation for rewards.”

The researchers hope that this study might help in the identification and treatment of ICBs in the future.

Charlotte Housden explained: “Often, when neurologists identify these risky behaviors, their only option is to reduce the dose of drugs which treat the primary symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as tremor and stiffness.

“However, this is far from ideal, since an inevitable consequence of this strategy is that these primary symptoms get worse. Our results suggest that treating impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease patients with ICBs, for example with drugs used to treat other types of impulsive behaviors, might reduce their risky behaviors without worsening their primary symptoms.”

Source: University College London

Abnormal Side Effects from Parkinson Meds Explained

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Abnormal Side Effects from Parkinson Meds Explained. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/06/24/abnormal-side-effects-from-parkinson-meds-explained/14977.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.