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New Approach for PTSD Anger Among Veterans

New Approach for PTSD Anger among Veterans Researchers believe a treatment focus that addresses specific post-traumatic stress disorder syndromes may be the best way to treat anger among veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Most returning veterans don’t have PTSD or difficulty with anger or aggressiveness, but for the small subset who do, this study helps to identify related risk factors,” said Eric Elbogen, PhD, an assistant professor of psychiatry in the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and a staff psychologist at the VA Medical Center in Durham, N.C.

“The data showed that PTSD symptoms such as flashbacks or avoiding reminders of a trauma were not consistently connected to aggressiveness,” said Elbogen.

“Instead, we found that post-deployment anger and hostility were associated with PTSD hyperarousal symptoms: sleep problems, being ‘on guard,’ jumpiness, irritability, and difficulty concentrating.”

From interviews with 676 veterans, Elbogen and VA colleagues identified features associated with anger and hostility, which result in increased risk of post-deployment adjustment problems as veterans transition to civilian life.

Veterans who said they had difficulty controlling violent behavior were more likely to report witnessing premilitary family violence, firing a weapon during deployment, being deployed more than 1 year, and experiencing current hyperarousal symptoms.

There was an association with a history of traumatic brain injury, but it was not as robust as the relationship to hyperarousal symptoms. Elbogen said, “Our data suggest the effects of traumatic brain injury on anger and hostility are not straightforward.”

Veterans with aggressive urges were more likely than others to report hyperarousal symptoms, childhood abuse, a family history of mental illness, and reexperiencing a traumatic event.

Difficulty managing anger was associated with being married, having a parent with a criminal history, and avoiding reminders of the trauma, as well as hyperarousal symptoms.

“As we learn more about risk factors and how to manage them, we’ll be helping not only the veterans but their families and society at large. Veterans with these adjustment problems should seek help through the VA so we can best serve those who have served our country,” Elbogen said.

Source: University of North Carolina School of Medicine

New Approach for PTSD Anger Among Veterans

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). New Approach for PTSD Anger Among Veterans. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 12, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/06/17/new-approach-for-ptsd-anger-among-veterans/14682.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.