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Real-World Benefits of Behavioral Therapy for Depression

Real-World Benefits of Behavioral Therapy for DepressionA new German study confirms the value of cognitive behavioral therapy for management of depression.

Researchers based at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have been able to demonstrate both the efficacy and the extent of the beneficial effect of routine psychotherapeutic treatment for depression.

According to the researchers, although controlled clinical studies have shown that behavioral therapy is extremely effective in depressive disorders, some professionals questioned if benefits would occur with routine therapy provided in the environment of the normal psychotherapy practice.

Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders. It can occur at any time of life and it may affect children and adolescents as well as the elderly. However, depression can usually be suitably managed with the help of cognitive behavioral therapy.

“We have been able to prove that behavioral therapy is also of considerable value under these conditions, although our results were not quite as positive as those reported from randomized controlled trials,” states psychologist Amrei Schindler of the Outpatient Policlinic for Psychotherapy of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

The study population consisted of 229 patients who had been referred to the Mainz University Outpatient Clinic with depression in the period 2001-2008. Of these, 174 did not prematurely terminate therapy – in other words, they completed the full course of treatment.

“On average, the patients attended 35 therapy sessions in our clinic, so that each course of treatment lasted some 18 months,” Schindler explains.

Results were recorded at three predefined points in time. Evaluation of the data collected for the total sample of 229 patients showed that there was significant alleviation of depressive symptoms and psychological manifestations during the course of treatment.

On the basis of the results obtained using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) – a standard questionnaire used worldwide for self-assessment of depressive symptoms – 61 percent of all participating patients achieved a better than 50 percent improvement of their symptoms.

Whether patients were also taking psychotropic drugs while participating in therapy evidently had no effect on the outcome under these circumstances.

Patients normally need to wait for several months before they are able to commence therapy; in the case of the study population, this waiting period was nearly five months.

On comparison of depression-related parameters at the time of registration for the course of therapy and at the time of commencement of therapy, it was found that there had been no perceptible change to depressive symptoms during this waiting period.

“We conclude that the improvements are de facto attributable to behavioral therapy and are not the result, or at least not alone the result, of the use of psychotropic drugs or spontaneous remission,” Schindler said.

Schindler also points out that there were also distinct improvements in the patients who prematurely discontinued treatment, although these were not as marked as in those cases in which the full course of therapy was completed.

However, the results of the study also indicate that when therapy is provided under empirical conditions, as at the University Clinic, it is not quite as effective as under the conditions of randomized controlled trials that have been designed for research purposes.

A further study is to be conducted in order to determine whether and to what extent this effect correlates with differences between patient populations.

Source: Universitaet Mainz

Real-World Benefits of Behavioral Therapy for Depression

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Real-World Benefits of Behavioral Therapy for Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/06/15/real-world-benefits-of-behavioral-therapy-for-depression/14584.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.