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Macho Personality Tied to Driving Issues

Macho Personality Tied to Driving Issues A new study by University of Montreal researchers suggests hyper-masculine men are driving risks.

Researchers gave the instruction to “Catch that car!ā€¯ to 22 men sitting in a driving simulator. The more “macho” the man, the more risks he took on the road.

“Our hypothesis was that hyper-masculine drivers, often referred to as macho, were more likely to take risks in order to catch a car,” says Julie Langlois, lead researcher.

“We didn’t tell test subjects to disobey the law, yet they knew others had accomplished the same task in seven minutes.”

So what is a macho man?

In 2004, an American researcher developed the Auburn Differential Masculinity Inventory, a questionnaire to identify such men.

It comprised 60 statements such as “men who cry are weak,” or “generally speaking, men are more intelligent than women.”

Men had to answer questions on a scale of one (strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree).

Results of the car simulator exam highlighted men’s slight tendency for risk. Still, it was during interviews that a link between macho men and speed revealed itself.

“Previous studies had shown that hypermasculine men were more aggressive on the road,” says Langlois. “But we wanted to take it further.”

“Some men develop a passion for driving that can verge on the obsessive,” says Langlois. “They consider cars to be an extension of themselves and they become extremely aggressive if they are honked at or cut off.”

During testing, some participants disregarded how they were being evaluated on their degree of masculinity and caught the car within five minutes. Others caught the car in 12 minutes and were much less dangerous on the road.

Langlois’ study found that aggressive behavior is deeply rooted in the male stereotype. Aggressive driving allows some men to express their masculinity, which could serve as a predictor of dangerous driving.

Cars are often a vehicle by which character traits are expressed and preventing risky behavior is an issue of public safety.

Source: University of Montreal

Macho Personality Tied to Driving Issues

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Macho Personality Tied to Driving Issues. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/27/macho-personality-tied-to-driving-issues/14134.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 5 Jul 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 5 Jul 2016
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