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Barriers Impede ADHD Care for Minority Children

A new Michigan State study suggests a host of barriers prevent minority children with ADHD from receiving the most effective treatments.

MSU researchers believe schools and communities should do a better job of getting information to minority families about the combined benefit of medication and counseling for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Their findings are reported in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

“ADHD has multiple causes and multiple treatment approaches are warranted,” said John Carlson, associate professor of school psychology.

More than 4.5 million children have been diagnosed with ADHD in the United States, making it one of the most common childhood disorders, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The disorder, characterized by impulsive behavior and inattentiveness, often lasts into adulthood. Causes include both biological and environmental factors, the study said.

Medication such as Ritalin has shown to decrease hyperactivity in children with ADHD, while counseling such as behavior therapy and parent training can lead to improved relationships with family and friends, Carlson said.

The treatments can be successfully combined to treat severe behavioral problems, he said.

But according to study, which included a scientific survey of parents, blacks and Latinos are less likely than whites to consider combining medication and counseling for their children.

The barriers preventing minorities from seeking and using these treatments include a lack of culturally competent health-care providers, financial hurdles and little dissemination of information about treatments that work.

Pham said the “significant increase in children diagnosed with ADHD” intensifies the need for parents to be informed of all treatment options.

“Parents may bring different cultural beliefs to the treatment context,” Pham said.

“Therefore practitioners such as physicians and school psychologists must build on their own cultural knowledge when working with families to determine the best course of action.”

Source: Michigan State University

Barriers Impede ADHD Care for Minority Children

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Barriers Impede ADHD Care for Minority Children. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/13/barriers-impede-adhd-care-for-minority-children/13780.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.