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Parkinson Meds May Increase Impulsivity

New research finds common medicines taken for Parkinson’s disease may increase susceptibility to impulse control disorders.

Impulse control disorders include pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, and binge eating.

Individuals taking dopamine agonist medications for Parkinson’s disease were found to have a two and a half to threefold greater chance of developing the disorders.

These behaviors have been reported previously in patients with Parkinson’s disease, according to background information in the article.

Preliminary estimates of impulse control disorders in this population range from 1.7 percent to 6.1 percent for gambling, 2 percent to 4 percent for compulsive sexual behavior and 0.4 percent to 3 percent for compulsive buying.

Daniel Weintraub, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and colleagues studied 3,090 patients being treated for Parkinson’s disease at 46 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada.

Impulse control disorders were identified in 13.6 percent of patients, including gambling in 5 percent, compulsive sexual behavior in 3.5 percent, compulsive buying in 5.7 percent, binge-eating disorder in 4.3 percent and two or more of those in 3.9 percent.

The disorders were more common in individuals taking dopamine agonists compared with patients not taking dopamine agonists (17.1 percent vs. 6.9 percent).

Additional variables that were associated with these disorders included the use of levodopa, another therapy for Parkinson’s disease; living in the United States; being younger or unmarried; smoking cigarettes; and having a family history of gambling problems.

“Dopamine agonist treatment in Parkinson’s disease is associated with two- to three and a half-fold increased odds of having an impulse control disorder,” the authors write.

“This association represents a drug class relationship across impulse control disorders. The association of other demographic and clinical variables with impulse control disorders suggests a complex relationship that requires additional investigation to optimize prevention and treatment strategies.”

Dopamine agonists are increasingly used to treat other conditions, including restless legs syndrome and fibromyalgia, the authors note.

“Larger epidemiologic studies in these other populations are needed to examine the possible relationships between dopamine agonist treatment, other clinical features and impulse control disorders,” they conclude.

The report is found in the May issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Source: JAMA and Archives Journals

Parkinson Meds May Increase Impulsivity

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Parkinson Meds May Increase Impulsivity. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 17, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/05/12/parkinson-meds-may-increase-impulsivity/13745.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
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