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Motivation Important for Weight Loss

Obesity as an emerging epidemic in America is a cause for concern. Officials believe more than two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese with the condition threatening to shorten the lifespan of our children.

A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior examines how motivation might be a large contributor to sticking with weight loss programs.

Researchers at the University of Kentucky and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill examined two types of motivation, autonomous and controlled, and their relationship to adherence and weight loss in a 16-week Internet weight-loss intervention.

To measure the two types of motivation, a Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire was used to identify those participants motivated by intrinsic and extrinsic controls.

Autonomous motivation includes the feeling that self-control is the best way to help oneself make changes while controlled motivation includes being motivated by only external controls such as perceived pressure from others and feelings of guilt (controlled motivation).

Motivation for weight loss was measured at baseline and 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. In addition, study participants recorded their food intake, exercise, and body weight through an online self-monitoring system weekly throughout the study.

Over half of the participants (37 of 66) lost five percent of initial body weight at the 16-week followup.

To examine the relationship between the two different types of motivation and weight loss, the sample was divided into those who had and those who had not lost 5 percent of initial body weight by 16 weeks (37 and 29 participants, respectively).

The researchers found that the majority of participants had a significant increase in autonomous and controlled motivation between baseline and 4 weeks, though it’s not clear what caused the increase in motivation at 4 weeks, the face-to-face session given at the start of the study, early success with weight loss, or something else.

Although motivation increased initially for most participants, the group that went on to achieve a five percent weight loss sustained their autonomous motivation between 4 and 16 weeks, while the group that was less successful experienced a significant decrease in autonomous and controlled motivation over time.

The authors also found that autonomous motivation at 4 weeks was a significant predictor of adherence to self-monitoring and weight loss. Furthermore, this increase in self-monitoring appeared to be a way in which autonomous motivation led to better weight loss.

The authors found a positive correlation between weight loss at 4 weeks and higher levels of autonomous motivation especially when compared to participants who had higher levels of controlled motivation.

Writing in the article, the authors state, “It appears that the time period between 4 and 8 weeks may be an important window for weight control programs to consider using techniques designed to enhance autonomous motivation, including giving more intense support or different types of interventions, such as activities to enhance autonomous motivation or contact from a weight-loss counselor in the form of e-mails, phone calls, or face-to-face meetings.”

“It is possible that motivation measured a few weeks after the study has begun more accurately captures motivation than baseline motivation for weight loss since participants have become familiar with the behavior changes that will be necessary for weight loss and can better gauge their motivation for making those changes.”

“These findings suggest that building motivation may be an effective means of promoting adherence and weight loss.”

Source: Elsevier

Motivation Important for Weight Loss

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Motivation Important for Weight Loss. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 15, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/04/29/motivation-important-for-weight-loss/13298.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.