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Soccer for Psychosocial Health

Soccer for Psychosocial Health While we would all expect a study of soccer to reveal improvements in physical conditioning, a new extensive soccer research project finds that men worry less when playing soccer than when running. Women’s soccer creates we-stories and helps women stay active.

The 3-year project involving more than 50 researchers from seven countries suggests soccer can be used as a treatment for lifestyle-related illness.

Investigators covered several intervention studies involving men, women and children, who were divided into soccer, running and control groups.

Researchers found the results of the studies so remarkable that the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports is publishing a special edition issue entitled “Football for Health” containing 14 scientific articles from the soccer project.

Soccer for Health

Researchers studied the physical effects of soccer training for untrained subjects aged 9 to 77 years. The conclusion was clear. Soccer provides broad-spectrum health and fitness effects that are at least as pronounced as those for running, and in some cases even better.

Study leader Peter Krustrup concludes “Soccer is a very popular team sport that contains positive motivational and social factors that may facilitate compliance and contribute to the maintenance of a physically active lifestyle.

“The studies presented have demonstrated that soccer training for two-three hours per week causes significant cardiovascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal adaptations, independent on gender, age or lack of experience with soccer.”

Professor Jens Bangsbo continues:

“The effects can be maintained for a long period even with a reduced frequency of training to one to two times one hour a week. Recreational soccer, therefore, appears to be an effective type of training leading to performance improvements and significant beneficial effects to health, including a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular diseases, falls and fractures.

“In a number of aspects, soccer training appears to be superior to running training. Soccer training can also be used to treat hypertension and it was clearly superior to a standard treatment strategy of physician-guided traditional recommendations.”

The two researchers foresee a great perspective in using soccer as a health promoting activity: “The studies have convincingly shown that soccer training is effective to enhance fitness and the health profile for the general population.

“Future studies are needed to understand what is causing the beneficial effects of football, how well football can be used to improve heart health in early childhood and how other patient groups such as those with type II diabetes or cancer can benefit from playing soccer.”

Soccer creates we-stories and helps women stay active

One of the many aspects of the study was to examine the level of social capital women gained from running and soccer. Even though both the soccer players and the runners trained in groups, there were significant differences in the way they interacted and what they considered the most important aspects of the sport they were engaging in.

The runners were more focused on themselves as individuals, whereas the soccer players developed “we”-stories as they began to see themselves as a team. From the beginning, most of the women, both soccer players and runners, thought running would be an easier form of exercise to stick to after the intervention program was over. That turned out not to be the case:

“The most important finding was the difference in social interaction and creation of we-stories between the groups, which may impact the possibilities of long-term compliance.

“A year after the study, many of the soccer players continue to play soccer, some have even joined an organized soccer club. Not many from the running group have continued their training. This can very well be due to the fact that the runners focused on their health and on getting in shape, whereas the soccer players were more committed to the activity itself, including the fun and not letting down team mates,” says associate professor Laila Ottesen.

Men worry less when playing soccer than when running

Another study examined the exertion experienced during training for untrained adults and their experience of “worries” and “flow.”

This study, based on six groups of untrained men and women, showed that all groups experienced an overall high level of flow during the intervention, which underlines that the participants felt motivated, happy and involved to the point where they forgot time and fatigue.

There was no difference in the level of worry for the female soccer players and runners, but the running men seemed to worry quite a lot more than their soccer playing counterparts.

“The men that played soccer elicited lower levels of worry than during running, 2.8 vs 4.0 on a 0-6 scale, and although they are training at the same average heart rate they do not feel the exertion as strongly as during running” says associate professor Anne-Marie Elbe.

“Further research is needed to examine why men and women experience playing soccer differently but it could be that the men just have had more experience with football in earlier years than the women.”

Source: University of Copenhagen

Soccer for Psychosocial Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Soccer for Psychosocial Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/04/07/soccer-for-psychosocial-health/12661.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.