advertisement
Home » News » Meta-cognitive Therapy (MCT) for Adult ADHD

Meta-cognitive Therapy (MCT) for Adult ADHD

Meta-cognitive Therapy (MCT) for Adult ADHDA new study suggests meta-cognitive therapy (MCT), a method of skills teaching that uses cognitive-behavioral principles, improves outcomes among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Mary Solanto, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center examined the effectiveness of a 12-week meta-cognitive therapy group.

The intervention was intended to enhance time management, organizational, and planning skills and abilities in adults with ADHD.

“We observed adults with ADHD who were assigned randomly to receive either meta-cognitive therapy or a support group,” said Dr. Solanto.

“This is the first time we have demonstrated efficacy of a non-medication treatment for adult ADHD in a study that compared the active treatment against a control group that was equivalent in therapist time, attention, and support.”

The study observed 88 adults with rigorously diagnosed ADHD, who were selected following structured diagnostic interviews and standardized questionnaires.

Participants were randomly assigned to receive meta-cognitive therapy or supportive psychotherapy in a group setting. Groups were equated for ADHD medication use.

Participants were evaluated by an independent (blind) clinician using a standardized interview assessment of core inattentive symptoms and a subset of symptoms related to time management and organization. After 12 weeks, the MCT group members were significantly more improved than those in the support group.

The meta-cognitive therapy group was also more improved on self-ratings and observer ratings of these symptoms.

Meta-cognitive therapy uses cognitive-behavioral principles and methods to teach skills and strategies in time management, organization, and planning.

Also targeted were depressed and anxious thoughts and ideas that undermine effective self-management.

The supportive therapy group matched the MCT group with respect to the nonspecific aspects of treatment, such as providing support for the participants, while avoiding discussion of time management, organization, and planning strategies.

The study, titled “Meta-Cognitive Therapy,” is published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Source: The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Meta-cognitive Therapy (MCT) for Adult ADHD

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Meta-cognitive Therapy (MCT) for Adult ADHD. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/03/31/meta-cognitive-therapy-mct-for-adult-adhd/12478.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.