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Time Change Influences Sleep and Alertness

Time Change Influences Sleep and AlertnessMost Americans lost an hour of sleep on Sunday, March 14, the first day of daylight-saving time. For many of us this week may be challenging as it may be harder to wake up and we may experience difficulty staying alert.

According to experts, the effects include an increase in chance of sleepy-driving car crashes.

Ronald D. Chervin, M.D., says Americans can prepare for the daylight-saving time switch. Chervin says it can be as simple as going to sleep and waking up earlier by 15 minute intervals in the days leading up to Sunday’s change.

“Being prepared is important, especially if you need to be alert that day for any reason, particularly driving a car. Even one hour of sleep loss can affect some people,” says Chervin, a professor of neurology at the University of Michigan and director of U-M’s Sleep Disorders Center.

In the days immediately following the spring switch each year, more people have serious crashes, probably because of the sleep loss and adjustments that everyone’s biological clock must make to the new schedule.

The first day of daylight-saving time is not the only time when the amount of sleep should be of concern, however. Chervin says most adults should get about eight to 8.5 hours of sleep a night, but many get less and are chronically sleep deprived. Those patterns can start in childhood.

“We generally spend one-third of life sleeping—or at least we should,” Chervin says. “We’re learning more and more about how that one-third has critical impact on the other two-thirds.”

It’s hard to find any aspect of health untouched by sleep, Chervin says. The brain of a person who does not get enough sleep—in quality and in quantity—is unable to operate efficiently. Health, emotions, memory and more are affected.

Furthermore, sleep disorders also may increase risks of obesity, diabetes, stroke and heart attacks.

Healthy Sleep Advice from the National Sleep Foundation

  • Go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day, and avoid spending more time in bed than needed.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleep to strengthen the association between your bed and sleep. It may help to remove work materials, computers and televisions from your bedroom.
  • Create an environment conducive to sleep that is quiet, dark and cool with a comfortable mattress and pillows.
  • Reduce or eliminate your intake of caffeine, nicotine and alcohol.

Source: University of Michigan

Time Change Influences Sleep and Alertness

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Time Change Influences Sleep and Alertness. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 22, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/03/15/time-change-influences-sleep-and-alertness/12117.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.