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Gestures Improve Verbal Communication

Pointing or use of hands while talking may help improve communication, suggests new research.

Psychological scientists from Colgate University and Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands) were interested in the interaction between speech and gesture. Specifically, they wanted to learn how important this relationship is for language.

The research is reported in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

In the study, volunteers watched brief videos of common actions (e.g., someone chopping vegetables, washing dishes) followed by a one-second video of a spoken word and a gesture. In some of the trials (congruent trials), the speech and gestures were related (e.g., “chop,” chopping gesture), while during other trials (incongruent trials), what was said did not match the gesture (e.g., “chop,” twisting gesture).

The volunteers had to indicate whether the speech and gesture were related to the initial video they watched.

The results revealed that the volunteers performed better during congruent trials than incongruent trials — they were faster and more accurate when the gesture matched the spoken word. Furthermore, these results were replicated when the volunteers were told to pay attention only to the spoken word and not the gesture.

Taken together, these findings suggest that when gesture and speech convey the same information, they are easier to understand than when they convey different information. In addition, these results indicate that gesture and speech form an integrated system that helps us in language comprehension.

The researchers note that “these results have implications for everyday communicative situations, such as in educational contexts (both teachers and students), persuasive messages (political speeches, advertisements), and situations of urgency (first aid, cockpit conversations).”

They suggest that the best way for speakers to get their message across is to “coordinate what they say with their words with what they do with their hands.”

In other words, the authors conclude, “If you really want to make your point clear and readily understood, let your words and hands do the talking.”

Source: Association for Psychological Science

Gestures Improve Verbal Communication

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Gestures Improve Verbal Communication. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2010/01/07/gestures-improve-verbal-communication/10609.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.