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Celebrity Trivia May Distinguish Healthy Aging

New research suggests the ability to name famous faces or remember celebrity trivia may provide clues for early Alzheimer detection.

The study by Université de Montréal researchers is found in the December issue of the Canadian Journal on Aging.

“Semantic memory for people – triggered through name, voice or face – is knowledge we have gathered over the course of our lifetime on a person which enables us to recognize this person,” says senior author Sven Joubert, a professor at the Université de Montréal Department of Psychology.

The goal of the semantic study was to determine whether the ability to recall names of famous people decreases with age, since the condition named anomia ranks among the most common complaints from the elderly.

To investigate, Dr. Joubert collaborated with first author Roxane Langlois to divide 117 healthy elderly, aged 60 to 91 years old, into three groups who were submitted to two semantic memory tests.

In a first test, subjects were shown the faces of 30 famous people such as Albert Einstein, Céline Dion, Catherine Deneuve, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, and Wayne Gretzky.

They were first asked to name these famous faces, and then questioned on their professions, nationality and specific life events. In a second test a few weeks later, subjects were shown the names of the same 30 celebrities and were questioned again on biographical knowledge.

The result? Our ability to recall the name of someone we know upon seeing their face declines steadily in normal aging. Semantic memory for people, however, seems unaffected by age.

For instance, even if a subject couldn’t name George W. Bush they still knew he was a politician or president of the United States.

Another finding is that healthy elderly are better at accessing biographical knowledge about famous people from their names than from their faces. A person’s name provides direct access to semantic memory because it is invariant, contrarily to visual stimuli.

These findings motived Dr. Joubert to conduct a second study, in press in Neuropsychologia, on elderly people suffering from mild cognitive impairment and another group in the initial phase of Alzheimer’s.

“Our hypothesis was that contrary to the healthy subjects, both these groups should show difficulties finding the names of people, but that they should also show signs of a depleting semantic memory,” says Dr. Joubert, adding that since 50 to 80 percent of people with mild cognitive problems develop Alzheimer’s over the course of several years.

This semantic memory test could become an essential clinical tool to identify people at risk of developing the disease. Results show that the ability to remember names is even more pronounced in mild cognitive impairment and in early Alzheimer’s disease than in normal aging.

Contrary to normal aging, however, a decline in semantic memory for famous people was also observed.

Source: Université de Montréal

Celebrity Trivia May Distinguish Healthy Aging

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Celebrity Trivia May Distinguish Healthy Aging. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2009/12/22/celebrity-trivia-may-distinguish-healthy-aging/10348.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 5 Jul 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 5 Jul 2016
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