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Cell Talk Makes Walk Dangerous

We all know the joke about the individual who could not walk and chew gum at the same time. Now, the joke becomes reality as new studies warn of dangers associated with talking over a cell phone while walking.

Two new studies of pedestrian safety found that using a cell phone while strolling can place one in peril. And for older pedestrians (over 60 years old), talking on cell phones is especially a problem when crossing a busy street.

The studies, in which participants crossed a virtual street while talking on the phone or listening to music, found that the music-listeners were able to navigate traffic as well as the average unencumbered pedestrian.

Users of hands-free cell phones, however, took longer to cross the same street under the same conditions and were more likely to get run over. Older cell phone users, especially those unsteady on their feet to begin with, were even more likely to become traffic casualties.

“Many people assume that walking is so automatic that really nothing will get in the way,” said University of Illinois psychology professor Art Kramer, who led the research with psychology professor Jason McCarley and postdoctoral researcher Mark Neider.

“And walking is pretty automatic, but actually walking in environments that have lots of obstacles is perhaps not as automatic as one might think.”

The first study, in the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention, found that college-age adults who were talking on a cell phone took 25 percent longer to cross the street than their peers who were not on the phone.

They were also more likely to fail to cross the street in the 30 seconds allotted for the task, even though their peers were able to do so.

Each participant walked on a manual treadmill in a virtual environment, meaning that each encountered the exact same conditions – the same number and speed of cars, for example – as their peers.

The second (and not yet published) study gave adults age 60 and above the same tasks, and included some participants who had a history of falling. The differences between those on and off the phone were even more striking in the older group, Kramer said.

“Older adults on the phone got run over about 15 percent more often” than those not on the phone, he said, and those with a history of falling fared even worse.

“So walking and talking on the phone while old, especially, appears to be dangerous,” he said.

Source: University of Illinois

Cell Talk Makes Walk Dangerous

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Cell Talk Makes Walk Dangerous. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 27, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2009/11/19/cell-talk-makes-walk-dangerous/9659.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.