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Modeling To Prevent Teen Behaviors

Modeling To Prevent Teen BehaviorsResearchers are investigating the ways in which parents and peers influence teenagers on the use of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana.

Preliminary findings suggest parental and peer attitudes toward smoking influence teenagers on the decision to use multiple drugs.

Interestingly, genders were influenced differently.

For girls, friends were shown to be central. Tolerant attitudes within their social group toward smoking were associated with poly-drug use, defined as two or more of the following behaviors: smoking, drinking and marijuana use.

Among boys poly-drug use was predicted by the extent to which they perceived smoking to be prevalent in their larger age group, not just among their friends.

“If a teenager feels smoking is socially acceptable and widely practiced, they are much more likely not only to smoke, but to also drink and possibly use marijuana,” says lead author Dr. Jennifer A. Epstein, assistant professor of public health in the Division of Prevention and Health Behavior at Weill Cornell Medical College.

“While the differences between how boys and girls are influenced by these social factors are subtle, they could help us develop new gender-specific educational tactics for preventing these behaviors.”

The study also revealed several factors that were the same for boys and girls. When their friends drank alcohol or smoked or when their parents had permissive or ambivalent attitudes toward drinking, both teenage boys and girls were more likely to report poly-drug use.

Other major variables included teenagers’ inability to refuse drugs and achieve goals through their own efforts.

“A parent’s opinion matters. Moms and dads are critical role models and should let their attitudes against drug use be known. It’s also important to keep an eye on their child’s social circle, since, especially for girls, it’s their friends who are so central to influencing their behavior,” says Dr. Epstein.

“At the same time, parents can do things that reduce their child’s risk for using drugs, such as teaching them to set goals and assert themselves.”

Researchers analyzed confidential surveys taken by 2,400 sixth- and seventh-graders in inner-city schools in New York City. Questions dealt with substance use and several psychological factors that previous research suggests may be related to drug use. The majority of the schools serve youths from families with incomes averaging well below the federal poverty level.

The current study is one of the first to look at the relationships between smoking, drinking and marijuana use. The vast majority of research in this area has focused on a single substance in isolation, especially among white middle-class suburban populations.

The importance of Dr. Epstein’s approach is backed up by evidence suggesting that teenage poly-drug use is a significant risk factor for adult poly-drug use.

One implication of these findings, according to Dr. Epstein, is that “comprehensive prevention programs focusing on multiple gateway drugs (alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana) may prove to be more valuable than programs focusing on a single drug.”

Source: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College

Modeling To Prevent Teen Behaviors

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Modeling To Prevent Teen Behaviors. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 23, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2009/10/02/modeling-to-prevent-teen-behaviors/8731.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.