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Stress Associated with Medical Care

Usually individuals are satisfied with a service if they believe they are receiving high-quality benefits. However, research discovers this relationship becomes complex when the “service” is an activity that may not be desired.

The events, called “negative service environments,” are services that consumers would prefer not to have to use, such as health screenings or diagnostic tests.

A paper in the Journal of Service Research explores this relationship by studying the relationship between stress and accuracy beliefs in the context of mammography — a “negative” service.

They found that women coming in for a routine screening test felt more stress as their belief in the efficacy of mammography increased.

Meanwhile, those coming in for a diagnostic test felt less stress as their belief in the efficacy of mammography increased.

These findings suggest health care providers in hospitals should consider a patient’s stage in the testing process to determine how to best manage the patient’s experience and reduce stress levels.

The article suggests separating routine screening patients from diagnostic screening patients, so doctors and nurses can better tailor communication to these different patient groups.

For routine screening patients, service providers should help reduce stress for patients by playing soothing music or providing distracting magazines in the waiting room.

For diagnostic screening patients, service providers should focus on reducing patients’ uncertainty by having information on the testing process, the latest advances in preventive care, or the kinds of treatment to which it leads available in the waiting room.

Source: Sage Publications

Stress Associated with Medical Care

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Stress Associated with Medical Care. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 21, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2009/08/20/stress-associated-with-medical-care/7873.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.