Seung Hui Cho's Missing Mental Health Records SurfaceSeung-Hui Cho, the Virginia Tech student who murdered 32 of his fellow classmates two years ago on campus, has had his missing mental health records discovered in the home of the former director of the student counseling center.

Seung-Hui Cho, a South Korean student, opened fire on his classmates for no apparent reason, killing 32 people and himself on April 16, 2007. Cho’s mental health records from when he was seen at the university’s counseling center went missing and couldn’t be located during the extensive state investigation into the event.

Virginia’s Governor Timothy Kaine announced Wednesday that the records turned up as a result of pretrial discovery in two lawsuits that have been filed by families of Cho’s victims. Neither the Virginia state police nor a state investigative commission had been able to locate the files during the prior two years.

Cho killed 32 people on April 16, 2007, then committed suicide as police closed in. His mental health treatment has been a major issue in the vast investigation of the shootings.

Virginia Tech reportedly found the records last Thursday, but didn’t notify state officials until Monday of this week. Neither the university nor state officials have made public the content of the records, but Gov. Kaine has stated that he will make the contents of the records public as soon as possible.

The memo accompanying the records from the university says Cho’s records were found last week in the home of Dr. Robert C. Miller, the former head of the university’s counseling center. The memo said Cho’s records were removed from the Cook Counseling Center on the Virginia Tech campus more than a year before the shootings, when Miller left the clinic.

All but two families have settled a lawsuit with the university for $11 million. The discovery of the missing records may call into question the previous settlements, especially if something is found within the records that suggests that university personnel had specific knowledge of the tragic events that later unfolded.

The two families that did not settle with the university have filed lawsuits, alleging gross negligence against Dr. Miller and the university.