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Are Dementia Tests Outdated?

Several of the psychological instruments previously used to predict which elderly individuals risk developing dementia do not seem to work any longer, suggests a new report.

The thesis shows that memory loss is the only factor that can still be used to indicate who is at risk, although not among the very old.

The study compared nondemented 70-year-olds examined in the early 1970s with nondemented 70-year-olds examined in the year 2000. The results show that those who were examined in 2000 scored much higher on psychological tests than those examined 30 years earlier.

This finding clearly indicates that such tests can no longer be used to predict future dementia.

In the early 1970s, several different tests could be used to predict people’s risks of developing dementia, but today it seems like psychiatric evaluation of the memory is the only useful test. In addition, it is more difficult to predict dementia the higher the person’s level of education, says physician PhD Simona Sacuiu, the author of the thesis.

The follow-up of the 70-year-olds five years later showed that 5 percent had developed dementia.

Those with memory problems showed an increased risk of developing dementia, although not everybody with poor memory developed dementia. Consequently, the link between forgetfulness and future dementia is more complex than commonly thought. Memory loss among elderly individuals may, but doesn’t have to be, an early sign.

“In order to effectively detect dementia at an early stage, we need a useful tool that includes several types of tests, but the tests need continuous adjustments since the elderly of today perform much better at standardized psychological tests than previous generations,” says Sacuiu.

Examinations of a group of nondemented 85-year-olds show that the link between memory problems and dementia is not as clear in this age group. The 85-year-olds’ ability to find words, to copy a geometric figure and to make quick decisions were some qualities that were evaluated in a psychiatric assessment.

More than 300 individuals participated in the study, of which 17 percent had developed dementia at a three-year followup.

“We can’t say that memory loss is the only meaningful sign of future dementia among 85-year-olds, since other symptoms, such as difficulties finding words or drawing a geometric figure, were needed for their risk of developing dementia to increase,” says Sacuiu.

Source: Sahlgrenska Academy

Are Dementia Tests Outdated?

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Are Dementia Tests Outdated?. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2009/05/21/are-dementia-tests-outdated/6022.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.