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Different Ethnic Response to Antidepressants

manIn a new study, a team of researchers discover Spanish-speaking Hispanics take longer to respond to medication for depression and are less likely to go into remission than English-speaking Hispanics.

Scientist from the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed) report their findings in November’s Psychiatric Services journal.

Using data from the nation’s largest real-world clinical study of depression, the researchers found the Spanish-speaking participants in the study were older and were more likely to be women than the English speakers.

The Spanish speakers also had less education and lower income, more medical issues and were more likely than English speakers to be seen in primary care than psychiatric clinics.

“Once we adjusted for these differences in their socioeconomic status, both groups responded about the same to medication for depression,” said Ira Lesser, M.D., a LA BioMed investigator who authored the report.

“These results are important for clinicians and patients to be aware that Spanish-speaking Hispanics with depression who come from lower social economic groups may need more than medication for depression.”

Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the study surveyed the treatment records of 195 Spanish-speaking and English-speaking Hispanics who had sought care at the Los Angeles and San Diego sites from among the more than 4,000 patients who participated in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study, the nation’s largest real-world study of depression.

“Hispanics are the nation’s largest ethnic minority and its fastest-growing population group,” said Dr. Lesser. “As clinicians ourselves, we always are seeking information on the best treatments for our patients, taking into account the differences among them.”

Hispanics comprise about 15 percent of the U.S. population, and 40 percent are born outside the country. In the 2000 Census, 32 percent of Hispanic respondents who said they spoke Spanish at home also said they spoke English “not well” or “not at all.”

Depression is the nation’s most prevalent psychiatric disorder, with approximately 16 out of 100 Americans suffering from it at some point in their lives.

Source: Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Different Ethnic Response to Antidepressants

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2016). Different Ethnic Response to Antidepressants. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 12, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/11/05/different-ethnic-response-to-antidepressants/3270.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 30 Jun 2016
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jun 2016
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.