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Steady Job Equates to Better Health

manThe loss of a job or the change from full-time to part-time can do more than take cash from your wallet.

A new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) demonstrates that employment changes profoundly impact mental and physical health.

Dr. Carles Muntaner and his Canadian research team found that poor mental health outcomes are associated with precarious employment (e.g. temporary contracts or part-time work with low wages and no benefits).

When compared with those with full-time work and benefits, workers who report employment insecurity experience significant adverse effects on their physical and mental health.

The research team also found that stress at work is associated with a 50 per cent excess risk of coronary heart disease, and there is consistent evidence that jobs with high demands, low control, and effort-reward imbalance are risk factors for mental and physical health problems (major depression, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders).

Canada and a number of other wealthy countries such as the U.K., the United States, Australia and New Zealand all face similar challenges, Dr. Muntaner notes, because there’s a greater tolerance for inequities than in some other countries such as Sweden and Denmark.

“Access to healthcare is not the only determinate of a healthy community,” says Dr. Muntaner.

“All aspects of our lifestyle, including how we work, are intrinsically linked to our wellbeing and our quality and length of life.”

Source: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Steady Job Equates to Better Health

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Steady Job Equates to Better Health. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 11, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/09/16/steady-job-equates-to-better-health/2943.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.