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Teen Abuse of Painkillers Can Lead to Lifelong Addiction

brainA new study suggests the adolescent brain may be permanently damaged by exposure to the painkiller Oxycontin.

Rockefeller University researchers discovered Oxycontin can sustain lifelong and permanent changes in the brain’s reward system – changes that increase the drug’s euphoric properties and make adolescents more vulnerable to the drug’s effects later in adulthood.

The research, led by Mary Jeanne Kreek, head of the Laboratory of the Biology of Addictive Diseases, is the first to directly compare levels of the chemical dopamine in adolescent and adult mice in response to increasing doses of the painkiller.

The findings are published online in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Kreek, first author Yong Zhang, a research associate in the lab, and their colleagues found that adolescent mice self-administered Oxycontin less frequently than adults, suggesting that adolescents were more sensitive to its rewarding effects.

These adolescent mice, when re-exposed to a low dose of the drug as adults, also had significantly higher dopamine levels in the brain’s reward center compared to adult mice newly exposed to the drug.

“Together, these results suggest that adolescents who abuse prescription pain killers may be tuning their brain to a lifelong battle with opiate addiction if they re-exposed themselves to the drug as adults,” says Kreek.

“The neurobiological changes seem to sensitize the brain to the drug’s powerfully rewarding properties.”

During adolescence, the brain undergoes marked changes. For example, the brain’s reward pathway increases production of dopamine receptors until mid-adolescence and then either production declines or numbers of receptors decline.

By abusing Oxycontin during this developmental period, adolescents may inadvertently trick the brain to keep more of those receptors than it really needs. If these receptors stick around and the adolescent is re-exposed to the drug as an adult, the rush of euphoria may be more addictive than the feeling experienced by adults who had never before tried the drug.

In contrast to illicit drug use among adolescents, the problem of nonmedical use of painkillers such as Oxycontin and Vicodin has escalated in recent years, with the onset of abuse occurring most frequently in adolescents and young adults.

Recent studies by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration have shown that 11 percent of persons 12 years old or older have used a prescription opiate illicitly.

“Despite the early use of these drugs in young people, little is known about how they differentially affect adolescent brains undergoing developmental change,” says Kreek.

“The findings give us a new perspective from which to develop better strategies for prevention and therapy.”

Source: Rockefeller University

Teen Abuse of Painkillers Can Lead to Lifelong Addiction

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Teen Abuse of Painkillers Can Lead to Lifelong Addiction. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/09/11/teen-abuse-of-painkillers-can-lead-to-lifelong-addiction/2916.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.