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Childhood Upbringing Affects Stress Response

childA novel research study suggests the genetic and environmental bases of hormonal response to stress depend on the context in which a child grows up. Increased levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, were found among children living in difficult environments.

The findings are salient because this is the first time such an effect has been reported in young humans.

An international team, led by Université Laval professor of psychology Michel Boivin studied 346 19-month-old twins. The researchers explain the details of their findings in the latest edition of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

The study shows that, for children growing up in a favorable family environment, genetics account for 40 percent of the individual differences in cortisol response to unfamiliar situations.

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced in new, unpredictable or uncontrollable contexts. In contrast, if children are raised in difficult family circumstances, the environment completely overrides the genetic effect as if it had established a programmed hormonal conditioning to stress.

The researchers already assumed that variability in cortisol production among individuals exposed to the same stressful conditions depended on both genetic and environmental factors.

In order to estimate precisely these genetic and environmental contributions, they studied 130 identical twins who share 100 percent of their genes and 216 fraternal twins who share close to 50 percent of their genetic makeup.

Each child, accompanied by its mother, was brought into a room, and then successively exposed to a clown and a noisy robot. “These are not traumatic events, but they are sufficient to cause behavioral changes in most children of that age,” explained Professor Boivin.

The researchers measured cortisol levels in the children’s saliva before and after this experience and analyzed this data as a function of each child’s family environment.

Specific risk factors—tobacco use during pregnancy, low family income, low education level, single parenthood, very early parenthood, low birth weight, maternal hostility toward the child—have known effects on cortisol levels in children.

Almost a quarter of the families who participated in the study had at least four of these risk factors and were classified in the “difficult family context” category. The data indicate that genetic factors account for 40 percent of the individual variability in cortisol response among children from a favorable family background, but this contribution drops to zero in children growing up in difficult family circumstances.

Researchers do not yet know whether the conditioned cortisol response leads to permanent differences in cortisol production among children from families at risk. However, Boivin believes that this study confirms the importance of intervening early with families to reduce the risk of a disrupted conditioned stress response in young children.

“A transient rise in cortisol level is a normal response to stress. But continuously high levels of this hormone could be harmful to the child’s development in the long run,” warns the researcher.

Source: Université Laval

Childhood Upbringing Affects Stress Response

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Childhood Upbringing Affects Stress Response. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/02/21/childhood-upbringing-affects-stress-response/1948.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.