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Social Networks Aid Surgical Recovery

patientAn interesting new study finds that patients with a large support network of family and friends report feeling less pain and anxiety prior to having a surgical procedure. Furthermore, the connection appears to have a substantially positive impact on postoperative recovery.

The physician-lead study calls for surgeons and other clinicians to pay attention to an individuals social network. These relationships often play a major role in the perception of preoperative pain and anxiety, and can signficiantly affect patient recovery after major operations.

The research effort is published in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

“Strong social connectedness can have a tremendous impact on patient recovery by helping blunt the effect of stress caused by postoperative pain, as well as ease concerns about health, finances and separation from family members,” said Allison R. Mitchinson, MPH, NCTMB, research health science specialist, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor (MI) Healthcare System.

Social network size and social connectedness have long been known to affect health and well-being. Stressful events such as having an operation can further increase the need for social support.

“Since patients with limited social connections will likely require more pain medications, have longer hospital stays, and need additional caregiver attention after a surgical procedure, it is important that physicians are aware of this link,” added study co-author Daniel B. Hinshaw, MD, FACS, a researcher with the Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

“Patients should be preoperatively screened for pain and anxiety because these are strong predictors of a more difficult postoperative recovery.”

Patients undergoing major thoracic or abdominal operations at two Veterans Affairs’ medical centers (n=605) participated in a randomized controlled trial of massage as adjuvant treatment for postoperative pain.

Prior to the operations, patients were given a questionnaire assessing their number of friends and relatives and how frequently contact was made with the members of their social networks.

Patients rated levels of pre- and postoperative pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as postoperative levels of anxiety, depression, relaxation, and inner peace using visual analogue scales. Daily opiate use, postoperative complications, and length of stay were also evaluated.

The study found that patients reporting a smaller social network had higher preoperative pain intensity, unpleasantness, and anxiety (p<0.001).

Source: Weber Shandwick Worldwide

Social Networks Aid Surgical Recovery

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Social Networks Aid Surgical Recovery. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 18, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/02/12/social-networks-aid-surgical-recovery/1902.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.