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Naps Help Memory

napA new study discovers a brief non-REM sleep (45 minutes) obtained during a daytime nap clearly benefits a person’s declarative memory performance. Non-REM sleep is typically characterized as a shallow sleep without dreams.

The study, authored by Matthew A. Tucker, PhD, of the Center for Sleep and Cognition and the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, focused on 33 subjects (11 males, 22 females) with an average age of 23.3 years and is published in the journal SLEEP.

The participants arrived at the sleep lab at 11:30 a.m., were trained on each of the declarative memory tasks at 12:15 p.m., and at 1 p.m., 16 subjects took a nap while 17 remained awake in the lab. After the nap period, all subjects remained in the lab until the retest at 4 p.m.

It was discovered that, across three very different declarative memory tasks, a nap benefited performance compared to comparable periods of wakefulness, but only for those subjects that strongly acquired the tasks during the training session.

“These results suggest that there is a threshold acquisition level that has to be obtained for sleep to optimally process the memory,” said Dr. Tucker. “The importance of this finding is that sleep may not indiscriminately process all information we acquire during wakefulness, only the information we learn well.”

It is recommended that adults get between seven and eight hours of nightly sleep.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) offers the following tips on how to get a good night’s sleep:

    • Follow a consistent bedtime routine.
    • Establish a relaxing setting at bedtime.
    • Get a full night’s sleep every night.
    • Avoid foods or drinks that contain caffeine, as well as any medicine that has a stimulant, prior to bedtime.
    • Do not bring your worries to bed with you.
    • Do not go to bed hungry, but don’t eat a big meal before bedtime either.
    • Avoid any rigorous exercise within six hours of your bedtime.
    • Make your bedroom quiet, dark and a little bit cool.
    • Get up at the same time every morning.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Naps Help Memory

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Naps Help Memory. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2008/02/04/naps-help-memory/1870.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.