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Caregivers Also Need Support

womanAsk any family member who has experienced a loved one’s battle against cancer and they will tell you the toll associated with being supportive and nurturing is physically and mentally exhaustive.

Now, new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center shows that it’s important to address the caregiver’s emotional needs.

In fact, attention to both patient and caregiver needs enhance improved quality of life for each party.

Specifically, researchers found that a targeted intervention aimed at prostate cancer patients and their caregiver spouses provided significant improvements for the spouse in physical and emotional quality of life.

“We need to provide more care and concern to the family caregiver of cancer patients. They have a vital role. We can no longer leave them in the waiting room or on the sidelines,” says lead study author Laurel Northouse, Ph.D., R.N.

Results of the study appear Nov. 12 in the early online version of the journal Cancer. The study will be published in the journal’s Dec. 15 print edition.

The study looked at 235 men with prostate cancer and their spouses. Patients and spouses completed a series of questionnaires addressing physical and emotional health at the start of the study, and again at four months, eight months and 12 months later.

The couples were randomly assigned to receive standard clinical care with or without a special family-based intervention. The intervention, called the FOCUS Program, included three 90-minute home visits by nurses and two 30-minute phone sessions over the course of four months.

FOCUS was developed by U-M researchers and addresses five areas: family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction and symptom management. Interventions were designed to encourage communication between the couple, reduce stress and improve coping skills.

The researchers found that while patients reported some improvements after the FOCUS intervention, the spouses had significantly more benefit.

Spouses who completed the intervention had better physical quality of life eight months and a year later compared to spouses who did not complete the intervention. The intervention spouses also had less uncertainty, a better attitude toward caregiving and less hopelessness than spouses who did not complete the intervention. The intervention spouses were more confident about managing the illness and had better communication with their husbands.

“The intervention had a stronger effect on the caregiver than the patient because the spouse caregiver had a greater need for support. Typically, the patient gets supportive services at the clinic, from the doctor and nurses, or through support groups available to patients. Caregivers’ needs are seldom addressed by these services,” Northouse says.

Northouse’s previous research has shown caregivers report similar emotional distress as cancer patients. She’s found that spouses have lower confidence than patients in their ability to manage the illness, and more uncertainty about the illness. But despite the need for support, few interventions or support programs are aimed at couples or the spouses of cancer patients.

“Prostate cancer is a couples disease – it affects both the patient and the spouse. Including the spouse is very important because men with prostate cancer typically rely solely on their partner for support to get through the illness. But we know that spouses often don’t have the kind of information they need to deal with the cancer and the very serious side effects that can accompany the illness and treatments,” Northouse says.

“It’s very stressful to be a caregiver and not feel prepared for that important role. And the more caregivers feel distressed, the more difficult it is to be a good provider to the patient,” Northouse adds.

The researchers plan to look at ways to make couples-based support programs more accessible to patients being treated for cancer. The FOCUS Program is currently a research tool and is not offered widely at U-M. For information about available cancer support services, call the Cancer AnswerLine at 800-865-1125.

Source: University of Michigan

Caregivers Also Need Support

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Caregivers Also Need Support. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 16, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/11/12/caregivers-also-need-support/1521.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.