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Drug May Protect Brain From Disorders

PillsResearchers discover a drug used to treat high blood pressure and enlargement of the prostate may protect the brain from damage caused by post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, depression and schizophrenia.

The medication known as Prazosin, is also prescribed as an antipsychotic medication. Oregon Health & Science University and Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center researchers discovered the drug blocks the increase of steroid hormones known as glucocorticoids.

Elevated levels of glucocorticoids are associated with atrophy in nerve branches where impulses are transmitted, and even nerve cell death, in the hippocampus.

The hippocampus is the elongated ridge located in the cerebral cortex of the brain where emotions and memory are processed.

“It’s known, from human studies, that corticosteroids are not good for you cognitively,” said study co-author S. Paul Berger, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, OHSU School of Medicine and the PVAMC.

“We think prazosin protects the brain from being damaged by excessive levels of corticosteroid stress hormones.”

The study, titled “Prazosin attenuates dexamethasone-induced HSP70 expression in the cortex,” is being presented during a poster session today at Neuroscience 2007, the annual Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego.

Scientists believe stress activates a neurochemical response in the brain that triggers the release of glucocorticoids in the brain, and that high levels of glucocorticoids in blood serum are associated with such psychiatric conditions as schizophrenia, depression, PTSD and Alzheimer’s disease. This mechanism has been linked to decreases in cognitive performance in older people who are not suffering from clinical dementia.

“Our hypothesis is that just being afraid of being blown up all the time means you have high levels of steroids all the time,” Berger said, referring to PTSD among military personnel.

Low levels of glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory effects in the brain, but high levels can trigger inflammatory mechanisms that damage nerve cells by activating an enzyme that causes oxidative stress. Even a single exposure to a high dose of glucocorticoids can be sufficient to damage nerve cells: A previous study showed synthetic glucocorticoid therapy to treat autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis can induce mood disorders, including psychosis, and cognitive impairment known as “steroid dementia” in severe forms.

To determine the effects of prazosin, OHSU and PVAMC researchers, led by Altaf Darvesh, Ph.D., formerly of the OHSU Department of Psychiatry, administered a glucocorticoid called dexamethasone to rats, then measured the expression of a protein known as heat shock protein 70, or HSP70, that serves as a marker for neurotoxicity. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 receptor antagonist, resulted in “significant” slowing of dexamethasone-induced expression in the cerebral cortex.

“The one thing we don’t know for sure is, would you have to get it before you’re traumatized,” Berger said. “Lots of people have high levels of corticosteroids when they’re under stress, so could we give them prazosin ahead of time to protect them from brain damage?”

Berger said future research will continue to look at where and how steroids cause brain damage, and just when prazosin would have to be administered to most effectively protect the brain against damage.

“We just looked at brain damage,” he said. “Steroids are known to cause cognitive impairment in both rats and people, so the next step is to see if we can correlate brain damage with cognitive effects and determine if we can protect against brain damage to protect cognition.”

Source: Oregon Health & Science University

Drug May Protect Brain From Disorders

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). Drug May Protect Brain From Disorders. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/11/07/drug-may-protect-brain-from-disorders/1500.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.