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A Daily Stress Measurement

Woman StressedA new research study uses a novel method to measure the psychosocial stress that accompanies the course of daily life. Study participants will wear a device, termed an eWatch, to measure the episodic stress that occurs in a normal day.

Computer scientists and engineers at Carnegie Mellon University developed the wrist mounted instrument to assess physiologic, environmental and kinesthetic activity that occurs over the course of a day.

The device will also provide prompts for an individual to participate in a brief interview to ascertain how they feel at a particular moment.

The study will be lead by Thomas Kamarck, a University of Pittsburgh Psychology Professor.

Kamarck and his colleagues have received a $426,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the first year of their four-year project, which is part of a larger NIH initiative to study environmental factors that people encounter every day that may increase their risk of certain diseases.

Previous studies have determined that people who report highly stressful lifestyles may develop higher rates of a variety of illnesses, ranging from viral infection to heart disease, but measuring exposure to stress is problematic.

However, Kamarck says traditional methods of measuring life stress don’t quantify the duration or intensity of exposure effectively. For example, “a husband and wife may react to the death of the same relative very differently,” he said.

“Furthermore, stress is an ongoing fluctuating process. At what point does a stressor begin or end?”

In the new study, Kamarck will outfit each participant with an eWatch, which can sense sound, motion, ambient light, skin temperature and other factors that provide clues about the wearer’s location, health status and current activity.

Every 45 minutes over the course of five days, the eWatch will prompt wearers to take part in a 2-to-3-minute interview. The instrument will record their response to questions about their current activities, such as “Working hard?” and “Working fast?” By the end of the study, several hundred people will have tested the eWatch.

Previous research has shown that responses to such interviews help predict who will show higher rates of plaque development in the arteries, a risk factor for heart attack or stroke. Using interviews in real time allows researchers to quantify how stressors affect one’s daily life, as well as to pinpoint when these effects begin and when they end.

Use of the eWatch technology should assist researchers in finding the optimal method for responding to such interviews during daily activities, whether by pressing a button, moving the wrist or speaking into a wireless ear bug device.

Environmental data collected by the eWatch also may assist the researchers in characterizing the types of environments people find most stressful, so that their location, such as home or work, may be recorded automatically.

“We want to capture a slice of life in people’s daily routine,” says Kamarck. “We hope that these new tools will allow us to do so while minimizing disruptions imposed by the act of measurement.”

First developed in 2004 as a class project at Carnegie Mellon, the eWatch has been the subject of a number of studies in which it has shown itself capable of monitoring behaviors and conditions.

“This new study is important in eWatch’s development because it requires that we simplify the device’s operation,” Siewiorek said.

“The eWatch must be simple enough to be used by anyone who wears it, even those who are not technically savvy. And we need to develop manuals and written procedures that will make it possible for other research groups to use it to gather data for their own studies.”

Source: Carnegie Mellon University

A Daily Stress Measurement

Rick Nauert PhD

Rick Nauert, PhDDr. Rick Nauert has over 25 years experience in clinical, administrative and academic healthcare. He is currently an associate professor for Rocky Mountain University of Health Professionals doctoral program in health promotion and wellness. Dr. Nauert began his career as a clinical physical therapist and served as a regional manager for a publicly traded multidisciplinary rehabilitation agency for 12 years. He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. His research efforts included the area of telehealth with a specialty in disease management.

APA Reference
Nauert PhD, R. (2015). A Daily Stress Measurement. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 19, 2018, from https://psychcentral.com/news/2007/10/17/a-daily-stress-measurement/1422.html

 

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 6 Oct 2015
Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 6 Oct 2015
Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.